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The Graphic Truth: Two different pandemics - EU vs US



The United States and the European Union have comparable population sizes, but until recently the trajectories of their COVID-19 outbreaks in recent months have been vastly different. In what many medical experts are now calling a "third wave" of the pandemic, coronavirus cases are rapidly increasing across most US states, and over 41,000 Americans are now hospitalized with COVID-19. Meanwhile, most European countries are fighting a full-blown "second wave" that has seen the continent's latest average mortality rates surpass those of the US, and led many European governments to implement fresh restrictions to contain the spread of the coronavirus. The current situation is a sharp contrast to the disparity seen over the summer, when US cases were spiking across much of the Midwest and South while European countries seemed to have kept the coronavirus (mostly) in check due to stricter adherence to social distancing and mask-wearing. Here's a look at the seven-day rolling average of new COVID-19 cases, and three-day rolling averages of new deaths and new deaths per capita in the EU vs the US since March.

Europe's rising COVID cases require new action; tragedy in France

Carl Bildt, former Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Sweden, with the view from Europe:

What is happening with COVID in Europe?

Well, we see infections on the rise virtually everywhere. It looks particularly bad at the moment in Czech Republic, in Belgium. Doesn't look good in France and Spain. Neither does it in the United Kingdom, by the way. But it has to be said, it's all over the place. So, we'll see new advice of a rather strong nature by authorities. We see regulation sometimes, we see restaurants closing down earlier, and things like that. Let's just hope for the best. So far, deaths are fairly limited so far.

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The Graphic Truth: Two different pandemics - EU vs US




The United States and the European Union have comparable population sizes, but until recently the trajectories of their COVID-19 outbreaks in recent months have been vastly different. As new daily coronavirus cases continue to rise across most US states — prompting worries of a "third wave" in hospitalization rates — many European countries are fighting a full-blown "second wave" of the pandemic that has brought Europe's mortality closer to that of the US, and led more European governments to reinforce strict measures to contain COVID-19. The current situation is a sharp contrast to the disparity seen over the summer, when US cases were spiking across much of the Midwest and South while European countries seemed to have kept the coronavirus (mostly) in check due to stricter adherence to social distancing and mask-wearing. Here's a look at the seven-day rolling average of new COVID-19 cases, and three-day rolling averages of new deaths and new deaths per capita in the EU vs the US since March.

What We’re Watching: Europe battles COVID second wave, Bolivians vote, Kyrgyz president quits

Europe's disastrous "second wave:" As COVID-19 cases continue to surge across Europe, the European Parliament cancelled plans to reconvene next week in Strasbourg, France, saying that the current uptick means that "traveling is too dangerous." It's the second time since September that in-person meetings at the EU legislative body have been cancelled, as countries including France, Spain, Belgium, and the Czech Republic grapple with serious "second waves" of infection, causing hospitals to fill up again in several European cities. In a drastic move Wednesday, French President Emmanuel Macron reimposed strict lockdown measures, including overnight curfews in multiple cities — including the Paris region — to stop the spread of the disease. (France reported 22,591 new cases on Wednesday alone.) After the 53 European states recorded the highest-ever weekly number of new COVID cases, the World Health Organization issued a dire warning Thursday saying that death rates from the disease could reach four to five times higher than their April peak in the near term if things don't turn around — and fast.

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EU sanctions Lukashenko; Brexit deadline likely to be extended

Carl Bildt, former Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Sweden, with the view from Europe:

The EU has agreed to sanction Lukashenko. What now happens?

Well, that remains to be seen. But the EU has now decided, in a sort of strengthening of its position, to sanction also Lukashenko personally. What this will lead to remains to be seen. I think we'll have to wait for what happens. The Belarusian regime is obviously under quite a lot of pressure, but it is digging in. It can still rely on its very strong repressive forces. We're in this particular conflict for the long term. But the fact that the EU is stepping up the pressure is a good sign.

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