Sign up for GZERO's daily newsletter

{{ subpage.title }}

US President Joe Biden takes questions from reporters in Washington, DC.

REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein

Hard Numbers: Dems vs. Biden, Indian population vs. China's, Ukrainian army vs. Russia, Asian Vegas vs. COVID

64: With friends like these … A new poll says 64% of US Democratic voters — and nearly all of those under the age of 30 — don't want President Joe Biden to run for re-election in 2024. Biden, who would be almost 82 at the time, says he will do so. Let’s see how this plays out as the presidential contest heats up.

Read more Show less
Annie Gugliotta

What We're Watching: Blinken goes to Southeast Asia

Blinken tours Southeast Asia. US Secretary of State Antony Blinken kicks off on Monday his first Southeast Asian trip as America's top diplomat with stops in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand. Following similar tours by VP Kamala Harris and Defense chief Lloyd Austin, Blinken wants to bolster US defense cooperation with ASEAN, an economic bloc made up of Southeast Asian countries, to build a bulwark against China in the South China Sea. He will also pitch Joe Biden's vision for US-led Indo-Pacific trade as an alternative to doing more trade with China, and talk up Southeast Asia as an alternative business destination for US companies looking to abandon China. But what ASEAN really wants is tariff-free access to the US market, a non-starter for Biden because he says big trade deals with low-wage countries will hurt low-skilled American workers. Meanwhile, Southeast Asian countries are in a bind of their own: doing more business with the US as an alternative to China will create jobs, but the Chinese won't be happy about it — and nowadays they carry a lot more economic sway in the region than America does.

Fumio Kishida, Prime Minister of Japan: Opening Remarks | GZERO Summit | GZERO Media

Japan's "third way" capitalism

Japan, the world's third-largest economy, has long been a bastion of modern capitalism. But newly-minted PM Fumio Kishida thinks it's time for a rethink of the neoliberal model.
Read more Show less
Net Zero Emissions by 2050 "Lacks Sense of Urgency" — Suntory CEO | GZERO Media

Net zero emissions by 2050 "lacks sense of urgency" — Suntory CEO

Like many other big corporations, Japanese brewer and distiller Suntory want to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050. But that's not enough for CEO Tak Niinami. "It's far away and lacks the sense of urgency," he says. Niinami predicts that especially after COP26 people will be wary of greenwashing, so it's essential for corporations to "to be transparent, showing society what we are doing and how much progress we are making" on climate.

Suntory CEO Tak Niinami spoke during the first of a two-part Sustainability Leaders Summit livestream conversation sponsored by Suntory. Watch here.

Want to Invest in Recycling Plastics? Embrace Risk, Be Careful Where You Divest From | GZERO Media

To invest in recycling plastics, embrace risk and watch where you divest: JBIC's Tadashi Maeda

Tadashi Maeda, governor of the Japan Bank for International Cooperation, believes there's huge potential for new technology to solve the global problem of plastic pollution via recycling. But to do so, he says companies should first be a bit less risk-averse with new ways of doing things, and don't rush to divest from countries that not only consume a lot of single-use plastics but also burn much coal like Indonesia or Vietnam.

Maeda spoke during the Sustainability Leaders Summit, a live GZERO event sponsored by Suntory. Watch the full discussion here.

Why We Need to Put a Price on Carbon: University of Tokyo’s Naoko Ishii | Global Stage

Why we need to put a price on carbon: University of Tokyo’s Naoko Ishii

If we are serious about doing the right thing on climate, only incentives to cut emissions simply won't cut it. Naoko Ishii, Director of Center for Global Commons, and Executive Vice President of the University of Tokyo, wants the carrot to be backed up by a stick in the form of a price on carbon that incorporates natural capital into economic policy. Once politicians do that, it'll be a lot easier for companies and individuals to see that further pollution will hurt our pockets as much as it harms the planet.

Ishii spoke during a live Global Stage event, "Climate Crisis: Is net zero really possible?" Watch the full event here.

(Some) Asian Countries Leading on Recycling Plastics | GZERO Media

Some Asian countries leading on recycling plastics

Asia produces half of the world's plastic and consumes more than 40 percent of it — yet doesn't recycle as much as other regions. But things are getting better. Eurasia Group climate & sustainability expert Colleen King shares examples from Japan, South Korea, and Indonesia — all of which show that Asia can do a lot more on sustainable plastics without the consumer pressure that's driving change in the West. King spoke during the second of a two-part Sustainability Leaders Summit livestream conversation sponsored by Suntory.

Refuse Single-Use Plastics — But Not the Rest | GZERO Media

Refuse single-use plastics — but not the rest: Aloke Lohia

Refusing single-use plastics is okay, but Aloke Lohia, CEO of Indorama Ventures, believes all other plastics should be given "a fair chance" at recycling. Lohia says that some plastics are already 100 percent reusable, while chemical recycling is "just around the corner." Lohia spoke during the second of a two-part Sustainability Leaders Summit livestream conversation sponsored by Suntory.

Subscribe to our free newsletter, GZERO Daily

Latest