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Iván Duque: I Should Have Been More Forceful With US on Drugs | GZERO World

Iván Duque: I should have been more forceful with US on drugs

Iván Duque has few regrets from his time as Colombia's president. But if he could go back and do better on one thing, perhaps he should have been more vocal on the War on Drugs.

For Duque, there's too much focus on the supply side of the problem — Colombian cocaine — and too little attention on the demand side: Americans hungry for the drug.

In a GZERO World interview, Duque tells Ian Bremmer that he brought this up with both Donald Trump and Joe Biden. Maybe, he adds, he should have said it more and raised his voice.

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Donald Trump announces that he will once again run for US president in 2024 during an event at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

The world watches Trump

Americans were watching as Donald Trump announced his presidential candidacy on Tuesday night, but Trump’s entry into the race also grabbed the attention of political leaders around the globe.

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Georgia Senate candidates: U.S. Senator Raphael Warnock (D) and Herschel Walker (R)

Reuters

What We’re Watching: US midterm cliffhanger, Russia’s Kherson retreat, ASEAN summit kickoff

Control of Congress hangs in the balance

“It was a good day for democracy and I think a good day for America,” President Joe Biden said Wednesday night about the midterm election results. The US House and Senate both remain in play after Republicans failed to deliver on their promise of giving Democrats a shellacking. While the GOP is still favored to take control of the lower chamber, incoming House Speaker Kevin McCarthy is likely to preside over a slim and dysfunctional GOP majority – hardly the wave he had anticipated. The GOP is still 11 seats short of clinching a majority in the House, and several competitive districts are still being counted. Control of the Senate, meanwhile, rests on three states – Nevada, Arizona, and Georgia – that remain too close to call. The race in the Peach State between Democrat Raphael Warnock and Republican Herschel Walker will go to a run-off on Dec. 6 after neither reaped 50% of the vote. What’s more, measures to enshrine abortion rights were overwhelmingly backed by voters in states including Michigan, California, and Vermont. Even deep-red Kentucky refused to back an amendment denying the constitutional right to abortion, proving that curtailing abortion access is a losing issue for the GOP.

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US House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) waves after speaking to supporters on midterms election night.

REUTERS/Tom Brenner

What We’re Watching: Domestic & foreign policy implications, lame-duck maneuvers, Trump 2.0?, a Lake of doubts

Probe payback incoming?

After being on the unhappy side of a raft of Democrat-led House investigations the last few years, incoming GOP House leaders are itching to launch a number of their own. Subjects may include the Biden administration’s clunky withdrawal from Afghanistan, the origins of the COVID-19 virus, the alleged politicization of the Justice Department, and of course, the GOP’s favorite target, Hunter Biden. What about impeachment? The Dems did it twice to Donald Trump. Could Republicans return the favor? Likely incoming House Speaker Kevin McCarthy says the GOP would never pursue it for “political purposes.”

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A Republican Led House Will be Tougher On US-China Relations | World In :60 | GZERO Media

US midterms have major global implications

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

Do the US midterms matter to the rest of the world?

Usually, no. This time around, absolutely, yes. In part because of China. A Republican-led House is going to be a lot tougher on US-China relations, export controls, Taiwan trips, capital controls, you name it, capital restrictions. And I suspect that Biden is not going to want to be outdone by the Republicans on this issue. So it will mean a hardening there. But also, just the fact that the US is going to be seen as so much more politically dysfunctional, efforts of investigations and impeachments and the rest against Biden. The administration and the fact that Biden has portrayed this as a loss of democracy makes it harder for the Americans to be consistent and coherent with allies around the world. It doesn't stop US leadership on issues like Russia-Ukraine, but it does actually matter.

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How a GOP Congress Would Change US Foreign Policy | GZERO World

US foreign policy and consequences of midterm elections

Republicans have a good chance of winning back the House after the US midterm elections. How might that impact America's foreign policy?

First, the GOP will start to question open-ended aid to Ukraine as inflation hits Americans hard, says Jon Lieber on GZERO World.

Second, Republicans will be more chummy than President Joe Biden toward Saudi Arabia and its de-facto leader, Crown Prince MBS. A lot of it has to do with gas prices.

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Will the 2022 Midterms Affect US Support For Ukraine? | US Politics In :60 | GZERO Media

Will the 2022 midterms affect US support for Ukraine?

Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, DC shares his perspective on US politics.

How is the US policy towards Ukraine shifting?

With Republicans well positioned to take control of the House of Representatives next year, the next likely Speaker of the House, Kevin McCarthy, recently warned that the US would no longer give a "blank check" to Ukraine when Republicans were in charge. This has lots of folks worried about a softening commitment to financing the Ukrainian defense against the Russian invasion.

But should they be? The United States has committed over $60 billion in aid so far to fund the military effort, humanitarian aid, and to directly finance the Ukrainian government. That is a lot of money that passed very quickly with little debate in the US, though it is broadly in line with US public opinion. A poll from the Chicago Council on Global Affairs found that 80% of Americans continue to support US economic and diplomatic sanctions against Russia.

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Colombia’s New President Gustavo Petro: Biden Team Aware the War on Drugs Has Failed | GZERO World

Colombia's new president Gustavo Petro: Biden team aware the war on drugs has failed

Colombia has long been the United States' staunchest ally in Latin America. It's also been one of the longest standing democracies in the region. But it has never elected a leftist leader....until now.

Last June, former Bogotá Mayor Gustavo Petro made history eking out a narrow victory in the presidential election. Since being sworn into office last month, he has signaled a radically more liberal policy agenda.

He's also said he's ready to reassess the historically close US-Colombia relationship. In an exclusive GZERO World interview with Ian Bremmer, Petro's first broadcast interview with US media since taking office, Bremmer asks the new president if he thinks the United States wants to help him.

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