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Will Trump's criminal conviction cost him votes?
Will Trump's criminal conviction cost him votes? | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Will Trump's criminal conviction cost him votes?

Just days after former President Donald Trump’s historic felony conviction, Ian Bremmer sits down with the New Yorker’s Susan Glasser and former US Attorney Preet Bharara to discuss the impact of the verdict conviction on the 2024 election and democracy itself.

What does Donald Trump’s historic criminal conviction mean for the 2024 election and for democracy itself? As the first US president to be convicted of a crime, Trump’s 34 felony counts have stirred significant political and legal turmoil, with many in his party faithful choosing the former president over the justice system. "The GOP's revisionist history on the trial has already begun," Glasser tells Bremmer. Bharara also underscores the trial’s legitimacy, stating, "It was an open and fair proceeding. There was a judge who ruled often for the prosecution, but often as well for Donald Trump's side."
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As Russia gains ground in Ukraine, Baltic states worry the war will spread west
As Russia gains ground in Ukraine, Baltic states worry the war will spread west | GZERO World

As Russia gains ground in Ukraine, Baltic states worry the war will spread west

In recent weeks, Russia has captured territory in the east and southeast of Ukraine at its fastest pace since the early days of the invasion. A six-month delay in the US sending critical military aid to Kyiv allowed Russia a window of opportunity to make significant advances. Now, military experts fear the war could spread westward to the Baltic states, bringing the specter of war to NATO’s backyard.

On GZERO World, president of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and former US Ambassador to NATO Ivo Daalder joins Ian Bremmer from Tallinn, Estonia, for an update on the mood right now in the Baltic region. Government officials in Estonia say they are worried because it’s clear that Russia, by extension, Vladimir Putin, has realized that their survival depends on a permanent mobilization of the country for war, which the Russian economy is now dependent on for growth. Should Ukraine fall or take serious losses, the war could move past the border and into the Baltics, which are members of NATO. As a former Soviet country, Estonia keenly understands what it’s like to be dominated by Moscow and what it would mean for other NATO allies if Ukraine fell.

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Is the US aid to Ukraine too little, too late?
Is the US aid to Ukraine too little, too late? | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Is the US aid to Ukraine too little, too late?

Former US Ambassador to NATO Ivo Daalder says the last six months of Ukraine's war with Russia may have been a critical juncture. He underscores Ukraine's urgent need for additional capabilities, especially manpower and ammunition, which the US has been slow to supply.

"[The Russians] just have more people, they have more guns, and they, importantly, it looks like they have more and better morale, which makes them willing to do things that otherwise people aren't willing to do."

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Is Russia winning the war in Ukraine?
Is Russia winning the war in Ukraine? | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Is Russia winning the war in Ukraine?

What would Ukraine’s defeat look like? Over two years into this bloody conflict, Russia has never been as close to victory as it is today. “When the history of this war is written,” former US Ambassador to NATO Ivo Daalder tells Ian Bremmer, “I think we’ll look back on the last six months as really… the turning point." Daalder joins Bremmer on the latest episode of GZERO World from Tallinn, Estonia, just a couple hundred miles from the Russian border.

"We need to start having a conversation about how serious this is, and are we going to accept this?" In a sobering and wide-ranging interview, Daalder outlines Russia's advantage on the battlefield today. “They just have more people, they have more guns, and importantly, it looks like they have more and better morale, which makes them willing to do things that otherwise people aren't willing to do."

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US-Ukraine policy under Trump would be similar to Biden's
US-Ukraine policy under Trump would be similar to Biden's | Stephen Walt | GZERO World

US-Ukraine policy under Trump would be similar to Biden's

Harvard Kennedy School’s Stephen Walt suggests that there’s not as much daylight between Biden and Trump as people might think when it comes to US policy towards Ukraine.

As with Trump, Walt argues, “Biden would also be trying to end this war sooner rather than later.” But where Biden would be looking to support Ukraine in securing the best possible deal in a peace arrangement, Trump might abandon Ukraine, forcing them to rely more on European support for security.

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Biden and Trump's Middle East policies are "almost identical" - Harvard's Stephen Walt
Biden and Trump's Middle East policies are "almost identical" - Harvard's Steve Walt | GZERO World

Biden and Trump's Middle East policies are "almost identical" - Harvard's Stephen Walt

In a candid discussion with Ian Bremmer, Harvard Kennedy School professor Stephen Walt highlights the striking similarities between the Biden and Trump administrations' Middle East policies. "It's hard to see a big change between the Trump administration's approach to the Middle East and what the Biden administration was doing up until October 7." Walt notes that Biden's actions have mirrored Trump's, from failing to fulfill promises like reopening the US Consulate in Jerusalem to continuing Trump's approach with the Abraham Accords.

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How the US election will change the world
How the US election will change the world | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

How the US election will change the world

What role will foreign policy play in the upcoming US presidential election? “More than it usually does,” says Harvard Kennedy School’s Stephen Walt in an interview on GZERO World with Ian Bremmer. “Partly because the economy doesn't seem to be helping Biden as much as it should be, partly because it's hard to look at Biden's foreign policy and tout a lot of big success stories."

In a wide-ranging interview comparing US foreign policy under a second Biden or Trump term, Walt suggests that they may not be as different as people expect. “On a bunch of big issues, the daylight between him and Biden just isn't that great.” It may come as little surprise that Bremmer disagrees.

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China's economic slowdown is dragging down the rest of the world
China's economic slowdown is dragging down the rest of the world | Dambisa Moyo | GZERO World

China's economic slowdown is dragging down the rest of the world

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer asked economist and author Dambisa Moyo to grade the health of the global economy amid ongoing geopolitical crises and Europe and the Middle East, stalled Covid recovery, and a major economic slowdown in China. Her answer is more optimistic than you might expect, given so much uncertainty and volatility around the world. It’s true that the US economy has shown surprising resiliency, which is why the world avoided a global recession in 2023.

But China’s economic slowdown is still a significant drag on the overall global outlook. Structural issues within the Chinese economy–a collapsing real estate sector, high levels of local government debt, the flight of foreign investment–have a major impact on the world’s finances because of China’s role as the largest foreign direct investor to the developing world, as well many developed economies. But so far, the policy response from the central government has been relatively slow and piecemeal compared to expectations.

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