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Russian hackers found targeting US election; robots that write?

Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, helps us make sense of today's stories in technology:

What are the Russians doing to the US election?

Well, they are trying to hack it. They're trying to hack into the accounts of individuals working on campaigns. They're trying to hack into accounts of nonprofit organizations. They're trying to mess it all up again. They're probably trying to help their favorite candidate, too. How did we find out about it? Well, Microsoft, thank you Microsoft, is running an election security operation and they noticed this. Now, have they found everything that the Russian group Fancy Bear is doing? I highly doubt it. We'll probably learn a lot more after the election, unfortunately.

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Toronto the next Silicon Valley; AI in policing; NYC Marathon

Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, discusses technology industry news today:

Will Toronto become the next Silicon Valley?

A lot of really smart engineers are going to Toronto instead of the United States because of this country's self-defeating immigration policies. Building Silicon Valley requires even more. And ideally, there will be time for the United States to reverse all of its bad policies.

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Will Superintelligent Machines Take Over: A.I. in 60 Seconds

True or false: Superintelligent machines will one day rule over humans?

Very unlikely. The reason is today's artificial intelligence is also known as artificial narrow intelligence, which means the A.I. we have today deployed in Internet engines, all the way up to autonomous vehicles, are nothing more than fancy pattern recognition tools that we humans fully control. And, in order to evolve from these tools, which we control, to tools equally intelligent or even more intelligent than us, there will need to be at least 10 or 20 huge breakthroughs. Breakthroughs like the ability to create self-awareness have self-awareness and have compassion and ability to reason and plan and also what desire to rule over humans which doesn't exist in tools. So this is very unlikely. If it happens it will be in the very long term. We currently have no engineering path to getting there so we better focus on some real problems caused by A.I. such as security, privacy and inequality. So don't worry about it.

Can A.I. Reduce Poverty and Inequality?: AI in 60 Seconds

Will A.I. reduce poverty and inequality or make them worse?

On the positive side, A.I. is enabling all technologies and industries and will create a huge amount of wealth in the world measured by PwC as 16 trillion dollars in the next eleven years and more wealth ought to reduce poverty and inequality. Another aspect is that A.I. can be applied to health care and reduce the cost of health care and can be applied to education and make it more accessible. So that should also improve. However, A.I. has the following problems. First, much of the wealth generated by A.I. will go to the powerful Internet companies and big data companies like Google, and Facebook, and Tencent, and Alibaba. So they will get richer and A.I. will displace a lot of jobs, so poor people might lose their jobs. And A.I. will make lots of money for AI Superpowers like US and China, and may make other countries worse off. So the answer is we don't know but it's something we have to think about.

The US and China's A.I. Strengths: A.I. in 60 Seconds

The US is stronger in A.I. discovery while China is better at implementation.

It's A.I in 60 Seconds with Kai-Fu Lee!

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