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UNRWA funding cuts threaten Lebanon's Palestinian refugees
UNRWA funding cuts threaten Lebanon's Palestinian refugees | GZERO Reports

UNRWA funding cuts threaten Lebanon's Palestinian refugees

Until recently, the United States was the single biggest supporter of the UN Relief Workers Agency, or UNRWA, the organization that helps millions of Palestinian refugees in Gaza, the West Bank, and in camps throughout the Middle East. But after Israel’s government alleged that UNRWA workers were involved in the October 7 attacks, that funding is at risk of completely disappearing, putting the lives of almost 6 million Palestinians in jeopardy.

GZERO went inside the Shatila Camp in Beirut, one of Lebanon’s largest Palestinian refugee camps, to better understand what the loss of UNRWA funding would mean for the people who call it home—the teachers, doctors, and local government workers who rely on UNRWA to provide basic services, like education, healthcare, and clean water to residents. The agency says it has enough funds to last through June, but it will need to make some tough choices after that.

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"Patriots" on Broadway: The story of Putin's rise to power
"Patriots" on Broadway: The story of Putin's rise to power | GZERO Reports

"Patriots" on Broadway: The story of Putin's rise to power

Putin was my mistake. Getting rid of him is my responsibility.”

It’s clear by the time the character Boris Berezovsky utters that chilling line in the new Broadway play “Patriots” that any attempt to stop Russian President Vladimir Putin’s rise would be futile, perhaps even fatal.

The show, which opened for a limited run in New York on April 22, stars Tony and Emmy-nominated actor Michael Stuhlbarg as Berezovsky, a larger-than-life oligarch whose billions buy him into the highest ranks of Russian power after the fall of the Soviet Union. When asked by President Boris Yeltsin to find a successor to lead the fledgling nation, Berezovsky taps Putin, a former KGB agent and ex-mayor of St. Petersburg who few knew well.

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The New York migrant crisis up close
The New York migrant crisis up close | GZERO Reports

The New York migrant crisis up close

Since 2022, New York City has absorbed more than 170,000 migrants, mostly sent on buses by Texas officials from the US-Mexico border. Many of them are asylum-seekers who hail from South American countries facing political and economic upheaval, like Venezuela and El Salvador. But increasingly, people from Asia, western Africa, and the Caribbean have been making the difficult journey to the US via the southern border as well.

Unlike other so-called “sanctuary cities,” New York has a legal mandate, known as a consent decree, that requires the city to provide shelter to anyone who asks for it. But the already under-funded, under-resourced system is struggling to deal with the influx of so many people. Adding to the chaos, in October, the city changed its policy to require everyone in the shelter system to reapply for a bed every 30-60 days. For asylum seekers already trying to navigate byzantine legal and healthcare systems, the instability can have devastating consequences.

That’s why grassroots organizers like Power Malu of Artists Athletes Activists, Adama Bah of Afrikana, and Ilze Thielmann of TeamTLC have been stepping up to fill a major gap in the city’s immigration system: greeting arrivals, pointing them towards resources, providing food and clothing. Most crucially, they're help people understand their rights and apply for asylum, so they can get work permits and find permanent housing.

Speaking from the front lines of this crisis, the organizers say the city isn't fully meeting the needs of the migrants coming here, despite spending $1.45 billion on migrant costs alone in 2023. "The illusion is that they're in these beautiful hotels and they're getting all of these services and it's not true," Malu says, "That's why you have organizations like ours that have stepped up and had to change from welcoming to now doing case management, social services, helping them with mental health therapy."

GZERO’s Alex Kliment spent time on the ground with newly-arrived asylum-seekers and the volunteers to better understand the reality on the ground, how this current crisis getting so much national attention is functioning day to day, and if the city could be doing more to help.

GZERO has reached out to City Hall for comment and will update with any response.

Learn more about the organizations mentioned in this report:

Catch this full episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer on public television beginning this Friday, March 15. Check local listings.
Understanding Navalny’s legacy inside Russia
Understanding Navalny’s legacy inside Russia

Understanding Navalny’s legacy inside Russia

Russian dissident Alexei Navalny was a uniquely charismatic, fearless, and media-savvy critic of Putin’s regime who will be extremely hard to replace, says GZERO’s Alex Kliment. But as beloved as he was internationally for his fearless stance against the country’s strongman leader within Russia, his appeal was somewhat limited to educated elites.

“There was a poll last year that only about 10% of Russians saw Navalny as someone whose activities they approved of about 40 or 50% said they disapproved him Navalny” Kliment says. “And a quarter of Russians had never even heard of him.”In 2020, recall, he was poisoned with a nerve agent in an attack that he blamed on the Kremlin. He later, on camera, tricked a Russian security official into appearing to admit responsibility for the hit.

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Israel-Hamas war is a mixed blessing for Putin
Israel-Hamas war is a mixed blessing for Putin | GZERO World

Israel-Hamas war is a mixed blessing for Putin

Over the past few weeks, the conflict in Gaza has drawn attention away from what used to be the most covered war in the world: Russia's invasion of Ukraine. You know who's not mad about that? Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Even before the Hamas attacks, Western support for Ukraine was starting to waver, GZERO's Alex Kliment explains. Now, Putin is perfectly happy to see Western governments and media distracted by the Middle East. What's more, a little unrest in the region always bumps up prices for Russian oil.

But there are a few reasons why this latest conflict in the Holy Land might not be a blessing for Putin. For one thing, it forces him to choose sides in a way that he doesn't relish. It took Putin 10 entire days to call Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu with condolences after the October 7th attacks. And while Russia condemned the Hamas rampage, Putin has also welcomed Hamas officials in Moscow and called for a ceasefire, something both the US and Israel oppose.

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Israel-Hamas war: "Just bring them back," says brother of 9-year-old Israeli hostage
Israel-Hamas war: "Just bring them back," says brother of 9-year-old Israeli hostage | GZERO World

Israel-Hamas war: "Just bring them back," says brother of 9-year-old Israeli hostage

Few people can grasp the horror that is Roy Zichri's daily life. Ever since his nine-year-old brother was kidnapped by Hamas on October 7th, along with his mother, Keren, and his grandparents, Roy and his family have been doing everything possible to bring the hostages home. But as Ohad Munder-Zichri experienced his ninth birthday somewhere in Gaza under Hamas captors this week, Roy has felt as powerless as the families of the 20 or so other children currently being held hostage (not to mention the 200+ total captives).

In the latest episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer, the show's executive producer, Tony Maciulis, asks Roy what message he has for Ohad's Hamas captors. "No message," Roy responds, after an emotional pause. "No message. Just bring them back as soon as possible."

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Will Israel's war with Hamas spread north to Lebanon?
Will Israel's war with Hamas spread north to Lebanon? | GZERO World

Will Israel's war with Hamas spread north to Lebanon?

In Beirut, a little over 50 miles from the Israeli border, there are few signs of the violent conflict capturing the world's attention. At least for now. Further south, there have been almost daily exchanges of rocket fire between the Israeli Defense Forces and Hezbollah, the Iran-backed militant group that dominates southern Lebanon and is a regional power in its own right.

Fear is growing, even in the north, that the war between Israel and Hamas could spill over into a broader regional conflict, GZERO's Fin DePoncier reports from Beirut. But Lebanon is reeling from its own internal struggles–It suffered a devastating economic collapse in 2019 that was exacerbated by the 2020 pandemic and a deadly explosion at the Port of Beirut that caused billions in damage. It's also politically paralyzed; its divided parliament hasn't been able to elect a president since Michel Aoun left office in 2022.

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UN Global Advocate Eddie Ndopu: Changing how the world thinks about disability
UN Global Advocate Eddie Ndopu: Changing how the world thinks about disability | GZERO World

UN Global Advocate Eddie Ndopu: Changing how the world thinks about disability

When Eddie Ndopu was a toddler in Namibia, he was diagnosed with Spinal Muscular Atrophy and given just five years to live. Now 33, Ndopu is on a mission to reframe how the world thinks about disability, advocating for human rights and equal access to education all over the world.

“The statistics are still abysmal. We're sitting between 90 and 98% of children with disabilities in the Global South who've never seen the inside of a classroom,” Ndopu says “It remains a travesty of justice.”

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