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Does Europe face a resurging terrorist threat after the Moscow attack?
Is Moscow terror attack a sign of what to come in Europe? | Europe In :60

Does Europe face a resurging terrorist threat after the Moscow attack?

Carl Bildt, former prime minister of Sweden, shares his perspective on European politics from Stockholm.

Is the terrorist threat to Europe back after what happened in Moscow?

Well, the bad news is, yes, it's there. There's no question about it. It's still coming out. Central Asia, Afghanistan. We have a very disturbing situation in part of Africa with ISIS gaining ground in different ways, so not directly threatening Europe so far. And we should not forget that we have a situation in the Middle East with Gaza and all of the emotions that that is leading to, that is bound to be a recruitment possibility for these particular groups. The good news, if there is any, is of course that evidently the Americans were able to pick up advance warning of this particular terrorist attack. And that shows that we have intelligence capabilities combined with different countries that could give us somewhat more security than perhaps we had in the past. The bad news in this particular situation is, of course, the Russian authorities didn't listen and very many innocent Russians had to pay a very heavy price for that.

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Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to a question at a press conference in the Kazakh capital of Astana, September 16, 2004.

REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov

NATO added seven former Soviet bloc countries 20 years ago

Twenty years ago this week, then-President George W. Bush welcomed seven former communist countries into NATO: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Bulgaria, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia.

This marked the largest expansion of NATO to date and it pushed the alliance further eastward to Russia’s doorstep, laying the rhetorical groundwork for one of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s many justifications for invading Ukraine in 2022.

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US-Israel rift over UN resolution: More drama than long-term impact
US-Israel rift over UN resolution: more drama than long-term impact | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

US-Israel rift over UN resolution: More drama than long-term impact

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

How will the US-Israel relationship be affected by the US backing a Gaza cease-fire resolution at the UN?

Well, it was high drama yesterday when Prime Minister Netanyahu said he was going to immediately suspend an Israeli delegation that was going to visit the United States on the back of that decision.Very unhappy that the Americans decided to allow it to go ahead and abstain as opposed to by themselves vetoing. And keep in mind that all every other permanent and nonpermanent member of the Security Council has voted in favor. A lot of US allies there. And you know, that would seem to be a big deal, except Yoav Gallant, Minister of Defense, still stayed in the United States and had a series of very productive and high level meetings with his counterparts in the US. And there are still negotiations proceeding that are constructive between the US and Israel and Qatar to engage with Hamas and try to get a temporary cease-fire done and a bunch of hostages released also called for immediate release by the UN Security Council resolution. So I think there's a lot more drama here than there is actual impact on the US-Israel relationship. And certainly a lot of pressure that continues to mount on a very unpopular Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu at home.

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Putin using Moscow attack as excuse to intensify war on Ukraine
Putin using Moscow attack as excuse to intensify war on Ukraine | Ian Bremmer | Quick Take

Putin using Moscow attack as excuse to intensify war on Ukraine

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

A Quick Take to kick off your week. Lots we could be talking about. But I want to go to Russia, where we have had a major terrorist attack with over 130 Russian citizens gunned down, killed by terrorists.

The United States has warned the Russians both publicly so that American citizens would know about the concern, but also with actionable intelligence privately over the past couple of weeks that ISIS was planning an attack on an area with major crowds in Moscow. Putin publicly dismissing that, kind of wish he hadn't, but that we are where we are. And Putin has now spoken to the nation. There have been a number of gunmen that have been rounded up and arrested four, that we know of, Tajik citizens and Putin did not mention that ISIS has taken credit for this terrorist attack, nor that they then released videos of some of the attackers as they were engaging in terrorism inside the rock concert venue.

Instead, he spoke implausibly about links to Ukraine that don't actually exist. Why would ISIS-K do this? I mean, the main reason is because one of their two home bases, Syria and Iraq, in Syria, destroyed by Bashar al-Assad with the direct help from Putin and the Russian military. Nobody else doing that with Assad on the ground. And there have been many terrorist attempts against Russians as a consequence in that regard, but none with spectacular success for them like we've just witnessed.

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Russian President Vladimir Putin lights a candle in memory of the victims of the Crocus City Hall attack, on the day of national mourning in a church at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow, Russia March 24, 2024.

Sputnik/Mikhail Metzel/Pool via REUTERS

Moscow mourns amid international blame game

President Vladimir Putin declared Sunday a national day of mourning for the 137 people killed at the Crocus City Hall outside Moscow on Friday. Several gunmen opened fire at the popular music venue late Friday, injuring another 180 and leaving more than a third of the building on fire. Crews are still sifting through the debris for bodies.

The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack, which came just weeks after Washington warned of possible terrorism at large venues in the Moscow area, which Putin notably ridiculed as fearmongering.

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Moscow terror attack: What happens next?
Moscow terror attack: What next? | Carl Bildt | Europe In :60

Moscow terror attack: What happens next?

Carl Bildt, former prime minister of Sweden, shares his perspective on European politics from Stockholm.

What's going to happen after the horrible terrorist attack in Moscow?

Well, obviously, the Russian authorities have great difficulties with it. The US gave advance warning that something could happen in Moscow. It was repeated by several other embassies. That was publicly dismissed by Putin. And, of course, Putin is saying that all of the danger that is there is Ukraine and the West. Nothing else. He has everything under control. And then suddenly, well over 100 people dead. And evidently the security authorities responding fairly slowly. So he has now to adjust his narrative.

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The first Patriot surface-to-air missile systems delivered to Romanian Army can be seen at the National Training Center for Air Defense, in Capu Midia, eastern Romania, September 17 , 2020.

Inquam Photos/George Calin via REUTERS

A European Iron Dome?

The head of Europe’s largest munitions maker made headlines on Wednesday by suggesting that Europe needs a new short-range air defense shield similar to the Iron Dome system that Israel has used since 2011. The suggestion reflects two important trends.

First, European leaders fear that Vladimir Putin will only become more aggressive in his bid to test NATO’s resilience and expand Russia’s territory – and they see little reason for optimism that Putin’s successor will behave differently. At the same time, they fear a Donald Trump victory in November would inflict irrevocable damage on trust in NATO and that, even if he loses, a new American isolationism will spread.

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Putin "wins" Russia election, but at what cost?
| Ian Bremmer | Quick Take

Putin "wins" Russia election, but at what cost?

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

A Quick Take to kick off your week. Want to talk about things Russian. We, of course, just had an “election” that Putin “won.”

There is no opposition to speak of in Russia. If you're running against him and allowed to run, that means that you are considered acceptable to the regime and you're basically there to play against the Harlem Globetrotters. What was it, the senators, the generals? I can't remember what it was called, but that was the group that was there to make the winning team look good. Of course, you know, Putin is not as much fun to watch as the Globetrotters, but he certainly is politically talented and of course, it's important for him to show that he has an historic win with historic turnout better than anyone before in Russia, not quite Turkmen in Turkmenbashi in Central Asia, not quite Aliyev levels in Azerbaijan, but strong enough for Russia.

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