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Key Supreme Court decisions; how coronavirus impacts US election

Jon Lieber, managing director for the United States at Eurasia Group, shares his insights on US politics:

How is coronavirus jeopardizing the legitimacy of a 2020 presidential election?

Well, what coronavirus is doing is a lot of states are worrying about people who aren't going to want to come to the polling places in the fall, and they're worried about a shortage of polling workers who are going to want to come out and volunteer to get sick by interacting with a bunch people in person. So, what they're doing is they're looking at making a shift to vote-by-mail. Most states allow some form of absentee balloting today. Five states just automatically mail you a ballot and they don't do any in-person voting. But the challenge here is that a lot of states are unprepared for the sharp increase that's expected. In the last election, 25% of ballots were cast by mail. You may see 50, 60 or even more percent of ballots cast by mail this time, which could overwhelm election administration, which happens at the state level.

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Quick Take: As COVID cases rise, Trump’s reelection prospects fall

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Happy Monday with coronavirus still going on. So it's in the middle. And we've got plenty to talk about. I'll get right into it. Cases, of course, are going up all over the world. And despite the fact that we are paying the most attention to the United States right now, it's important to recognize that within about a week, most of the countries that that are leading the "league tables" as it were, in case load, are going to be outside of the advanced industrial economies. Indeed, I would say within a week, the U.S. and U.K. will be the only remaining countries of the top 10 that are wealthy democracies. The rest are going to be developing countries. And that is where this disease is going, despite all of the challenges here in the United States.
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GOP & police reform bill; US public on reopening; Biden's lead on Trump

Jon Lieber, managing director for the United States at Eurasia Group, provides his perspective:


What is the status of the federal police reform bill?

Well, the House has passed a bill already and the Senate has their own version. The big differences between the two is that the Senate bill doesn't ban chokeholds. It doesn't ban no knock warrants. And it allows qualified immunity for police to continue. Senate Democrats have said this is unacceptable. The bill cannot be fixed and have refused to even allow it to come to the floor of the Senate for debate. Not a great moment in U.S. congressional history. And it looks like this isn't going to happen.

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Biden Enters The Race: US Politics in 60 Seconds

Will Don McGahn wind up testifying before Congress?

Really tough call. I think he probably will. I think that he wants to. White House will invoke executive privilege. There will be a legal fight. But if he gets up there, it could be like John Dean in 1973, because McGahn knows exactly what Trump said on firing Robert Mueller.

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Allegations Rock Biden's Presidential Bid: US Politics in 60 Seconds

Allegations against Joe Biden may slow down his presidential announcement.

It's US Politics in 60 Seconds with Ben White!


And go deeper on topics like cybersecurity and artificial intelligence at Microsoft on The Issues.

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