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China's repression and growing global influence; US stimulus, and Trump vs. Murdoch

Watch: Ian Bremmer with your last Quick Take of 2020. 2021, just around the corner. We know it's going to be better. I mean, not immediately. It's going to take some time. We're still in the teeth of this crisis. But 2021 feels like many of us are going to emerge from crisis. And that is a positive thing. The idea of going to work every day, sending your kids to school, just being normal, being a little bit more normal, something that I wish for all of us as soon as humanly possible.

Back to the news of the day: I was so disturbed to see this citizen journalist get four years in prison in China for reporting on what the Chinese government was doing in Wuhan in terms of the scale of the pandemic, the crackdown and the rest. She's been on hunger strike for some time. The sentencing came down just a few hours ago. All of three hours in the courts, such as they are. We know no rule of law, no independent judiciary in China. And don't you dare go after the official narrative. That is frowned upon to say the least.

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How the US-China relationship would change under a “President Biden”

"Instead of simply embracing China, we have to draw clear lines about where China can legitimately pursue its interests and where we are going to push back." According to Anne-Marie Slaughter, who was a top State Department official under President Obama, a President Biden would do well to avoid blaming Beijing for the pandemic. There will be plenty else, aside from pointing fingers, for the two countries to worry about. She talks to Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Watch the episode: How a "President Biden" could reshape US foreign policy

Quick Take: Executive orders, stimulus & US-China

Ian Bremmer's QuickTake:

It's Monday, coronavirus still going on. Plenty to talk about.

I mean, I guess the biggest news in the United States is the fact that we still don't have any stimulus going forward. I mean, now, keep in mind, this is on the back of an exceptionally strong initial US economic response, over 10% of GDP, ensuring relief for small businesses, for big corporations, and most importantly, for everyday American citizens, many of whom, large double digit numbers, lost their jobs, a lot of whom lost them permanently but didn't have to worry, at least in the near term, because they were getting cash from the government. Is that going to continue?

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China's global ambitions & plummeting relationship with the US

"US/China relations have been plummeting. Pretty much everything is getting worse," Ian Bremmer tells viewers in this week's episode of GZERO World. In this commentary on the current state of play between the two global powerhouses, Bremmer breaks down the chess game that could be leading to a new Cold War: Travel between the two sides is restricted. Trade and tech competition abound. Beijing is consolidating control over Hong Kong and threatening Taiwan, while its internment of Uighurs has grown more severe. Meanwhile, Europe and developing nations alike are left with a very difficult choice.

Will US/China tensions lead to military conflict? Analysis from Zanny Minton Beddoes

On the latest episode of GZERO World, Ian Bremmer discusses the mounting tensions between the US and China with Zanny Minton Beddoes, Editor-in-Chief of The Economist. As US hawks talk tough on how to respond to China's increased aggression—Hong Kong, Taiwan, the South China Sea—Beddoes argues now is the time to pursue a more cohesive and long-term diplomatic strategy. "I would hope that…even with countries who have a fundamentally different ideology that you don't trust, that you don't share, that you frankly find abhorrent, that you can find ways of dealing with those countries, not just to prevent a descent into military conflict, but also to tackle the global challenges that we need to tackle," she says. "And what's really profoundly depressing about this particular moment is that in the face of the worst pandemic since 1918, which is ineluctably global in nature and demands a global response. We haven't had that."

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