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What are NFTs, and how do they fit into the crypto landscape?

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

You may have heard that Jack Dorsey is selling his first tweet as an NFT in an auction, but what are NFTs?

Well, I had to do a little homework. NFT stands for "non-fungible tokens." They are unique digital files stored in a block chain and essentially a rare piece of data that becomes an asset. Also, because it can be authenticated. Now, actual ownership is one-off, unique, so unique that Christie's sold one of the highest paid pieces of art by a living artist ever as an NFT, for $69.3 million. And I guess just like with art on canvas, whether that was worth it is a matter of personal taste.

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SolarWinds hack a wake-up call to the tech sector

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford University's Cyber Policy Center and former European Parliamentarian, discusses recent developments on big tech, privacy protection and emerging trends in cyberspace.

What immediate impact has the SolarWinds hack had on private companies?

Now, I hope it's meant a shock into action. The SolarWinds hack should be a wake-up call to all companies selling software, because any kind of negligence to ensure the highest security standards will come back as a boomerang to individual companies, but also to the tech sector collectively. Digitalization has come to mean privatization, and connectivity means vulnerability. Add these up and you can see the trust has to be earned every day.

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Section 230: The 90's law still governing the internet

The technology of the 1990s looked nothing like today's connected world—and the internet hosted just a fraction of the billions of people who now use it every day. Yet, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, passed in 1996, is the law that governs rights and responsibilities of social media companies…that weren't even around when it was written. Ian Bremmer explains on GZERO World.

How to change a social media business model that profits from division

The United States has never been more divided, and it's safe to say that social media's role in our national discourse is a big part of the problem. But renowned tech journalist Kara Swisher doesn't see any easy fix. "I don't know how you fix the architecture of a building that is just purposely dangerous for everybody." Swisher joins Ian Bremmer to talk about how some of the richest companies on Earth, whose business models benefit from discord and division, can be compelled to see their better angels. Their conversation was part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Kara Swisher on Big Tech’s big problem

Renowned tech journalist Kara Swisher has no doubt that social media companies bear responsibility for the January 6th pro-Trump riots at the Capitol and will likely be complicit in the civil unrest that may continue well into Biden's presidency. It's no surprise, she argues, that the online rage that platforms like Facebook and Twitter intentionally foment translated into real-life violence. But if Silicon Valley's current role in our national discourse is untenable, how can the US government rein it in? That, it turns out, is a bit more complicated. Swisher joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

How can the Biden administration rein in Big Tech?

Renowned tech journalist Kara Swisher has no qualms about saying that many of the country's social media companies need to be held accountable for their negative role in our current national discourse. Swisher calls for "a less friendly relationship with tech" by the Biden administration, an "internet bill of rights" around privacy, and an investigation into antitrust issues.

Swisher, who hosts the New York Times podcast Sway, joins Ian Bremmer for the latest episode of GZERO World, airing on public television nationwide beginning this Friday, January 22th. Check local listings.

GZERO Summit on geotech: US-China tech Cold War or “stable tension”?

Just a decade ago, China's rise — accomplished on the back of globalization — was welcomed by most of the world. That has changed over the past five years, especially in the realm of technology.

Now, China and the US, the world's two largest economies, are fighting what many are calling a "new Cold War" on tech, Eurasia Group President Ian Bremmer said during the panel discussion on geotech at the 2020 GZERO Summit in Japan.

Bremmer believes that this conflict won't end globalization but it is a confrontation that could dramatically change the trajectory of globalization as many countries are forced to pick sides on issues like artificial intelligence, data, or 5G.

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Will there be a big tech breakup? Apple likely to announce 5G phone

Watch as Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, explains what's going on in technology news:

How likely will big tech companies Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google be forced to breakup as recommended by Democrats on the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust?

I think it's pretty unlikely. I think there will be hearings. I think there will be damages. I think that there will be scrutiny on future mergers. I don't think there will be breakups.

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