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Journalism on Trial in the Philippines: Interview with Maria Ressa

On the latest episode of GZERO World, Ian Bremmer talks to embattled Filipina journalist Maria Ressa, CEO of the online news agency Rappler. Ressa and her team have been involved in a years-long legal battle that challenges press freedoms and free speech in the Philippines, as President Rodrigo Duterte continues to assert authoritarian control in his nation. In the conversation Ressa details the ongoing court battles that have her facing up to 100 years in prison if convicted. She also discusses Duterte's militaristic approach to COVID-19 response, and then issues strong warnings about social media's role in promulgating hate speech globally.

Can Facebook's algorithm remove hate speech? Meltdown-proof nuclear reactors

Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, discusses technology industry news today:

Do some of the Facebook's best features, like the newsfeed algorithm or groups, make removing hate speech from the platform impossible?

No, they do not. But what they do do is make it a lot easier for hate speech to spread. A fundamental problem with Facebook are the incentives in the newsfeed algorithm and the structure of groups make it harder for Facebook to remove hate speech.

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Ben Smith: Social Media & Responsible Coronavirus Coverage

NY Times Media Columnist and former head of Buzzfeed News, Ben Smith, speaks with Ian Bremmer over Zoom, and rates the job social media companies are doing in the battle against coronavirus-related disinformation.

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Coronavirus is "the Super Bowl of disinformation"

GZERO's Alex Kliment interviews Danny Rogers, Co-Founder of The Global Disinformation Index and assistant professor at New York University. His organization seeks sources and distributors of misinformation online, from scammers and con artists looking to profit off the pandemic to state actors spreading myths for geopolitical gain. He describes the COVID-19 pandemic as "the Super Bowl" for the spread of misinformation.

Sri Lanka Blocks Social Media: Tech in 60 Seconds

Should Sri Lanka have blocked social media following the terror attacks?

That's a hard one. Misinformation spreads on social media and there's an instinct to say, "Wait, stop it!" But a lot of useful information also spreads and people get in touch with each other. So I would say no they should not have blocked it.

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