Scroll to the top

{{ subpage.title }}

Are the US and China frenemies now? Perspective from Nicholas Burns, US Ambassador to China


Listen: US Ambassador to China Nick Burns joins Ian Bremmer on the GZERO World Podcast to look at the complex and contentious state of the US-China relationship. What do the world's two biggest economies and strongest militaries agree on, and where are they still miles apart? After Presidents Joe Biden and Xi Jinping met at a summit in San Francisco last November, it seemed like frosty relations were starting to thaw. But while China and the US have committed to re-engage diplomatically after the 2023 Chinese spy balloon low-point, there is still a lot of daylight–and no trust–between the two. So how stable is the US-China relationship, really? Are we adversaries? Frenemies? Toxic co-dependents? Burns and Bremmer discuss Taiwan, aggression in the South China Sea, China’s economic woes and national security push, and where one of the most consequential bilateral relationships between any two countries in the world goes from here.

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform, to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.
Ian Explains: Xi Jinping's nationalist agenda is rebuilding walls around China
Ian Explains: Xi Jinping's nationalist agenda is rebuilding walls around China | GZERO World

Ian Explains: Xi Jinping's nationalist agenda is rebuilding walls around China

It’s been a rough few years for China’s economy. Between harsh “Zero Covid” policies that shut China off from the rest of the world and major Communist Party crackdowns on private sector industries, the country is in desperate need of an economic jolt. So President Xi Jinping has been on an international charm offensive outside China, hoping to attract foreign investment. But if you look inside China, Xi’s vision is one of extreme nationalist messaging and centralized control that’s hurting his message abroad.
Read moreShow less
US-China relationship at its most stable in years as Yellen visits
US-China: Economic ties are “reasonably stable”, other tensions persist | Ian Bremmer | Quick Take

US-China relationship at its most stable in years as Yellen visits

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take: A Quick Take to kick off your week. Want to talk about the most important geopolitical relationship in the world, the US and China. Janet Yellen, the secretary of treasury, back over to China yet again, both to help ensure that the relationship is reasonably stable, also to deliver tough messages in places where she feels like that is required, the Biden administration feels it's required. And it's been a useful trip.

On the one hand, the United States, like the Europeans, delivering tough messages on Chinese dumping, on overproduction and low-cost goods going into the American and European markets, because of massive state subsidy, into key sectors. Particular concern on transition energy. On the one hand, great to see more effort to reduce carbon emissions, both in China and globally, and as the prices come down, that's a good thing. On the other hand, really hurting less competitive corporates that don't have that level of state subsidy in the United States and Europe. Tesla was really fast out of the box, hasn't got much support from the White House, but that's been the American champion to the extent that there is one. On the other hand, when you talk about other corporations, American and European, nowhere close to the Chinese. The hundreds of Chinese EV companies that are less expensive, they are higher quality, they are manufacturing at scale, and people can buy them all over the world. So, that is creating a lot of friction.

Read moreShow less
China's economic slowdown is dragging down the rest of the world
China's economic slowdown is dragging down the rest of the world | Dambisa Moyo | GZERO World

China's economic slowdown is dragging down the rest of the world

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer asked economist and author Dambisa Moyo to grade the health of the global economy amid ongoing geopolitical crises and Europe and the Middle East, stalled Covid recovery, and a major economic slowdown in China. Her answer is more optimistic than you might expect, given so much uncertainty and volatility around the world. It’s true that the US economy has shown surprising resiliency, which is why the world avoided a global recession in 2023.

But China’s economic slowdown is still a significant drag on the overall global outlook. Structural issues within the Chinese economy–a collapsing real estate sector, high levels of local government debt, the flight of foreign investment–have a major impact on the world’s finances because of China’s role as the largest foreign direct investor to the developing world, as well many developed economies. But so far, the policy response from the central government has been relatively slow and piecemeal compared to expectations.

Read moreShow less
Is the global economy finally on the right track?
Is the global economy finally on the right track? | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Is the global economy finally on the right track?

How’s the global economy doing… really? When it comes to the world’s post-COVID recovery, it’s a tale of two economies: the United States and everyone else. On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer sits down with economist and author Dambisa Moyo for a hard look at the health of the world’s finances and the impact of geopolitical crises in Europe and the Middle East on trade flows and inflation.

Right now, US indicators are strong, but Germany and the UK are slipping into mild recessions, and China’s collapsing real estate sector, local government debt, and exodus of foreign investment is dragging the world’s second-largest economy into stagnation. Not to mention, Global South countries are holding record amounts of debt. So what does it all mean moving forward? Is the global economy still shaking off its post-Covid hangover or are some of these problems more entrenched?

Read moreShow less
GZERO

The global economy: good news and bad news from economist Dambisa Moyo


Listen: In the latest episode of the GZERO World Podcast, Ian Bremmer sits down with economist, author, and member of the UK parliament’s House of Lords Dambisa Moyo for a hard look at the health of the world’s finances, the impact of geopolitical crises in Europe and the Middle East on trade flows and inflation, and how China’s economic woes are impacting everyone else.

Read moreShow less

A warning sign alerts visitors of the extreme heat dangers at Badwater Basin, the lowest point in North America at 279 feet below sea level, in Death Valley National Park, California, U.S. August 17, 2020.

REUTERS/David Becker

Hard Numbers: Earth sets gloomy climate record, China’s economy deflates, US Marines found dead, Nigeria faces off with Ivory Coast

1.5: The world experienced its first 12-month period (Feb. 2023 - Jan. 2024) in which average global temperatures were more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, according to the European Union's Copernicus Climate Change Service. This, combined with last month being the warmest January on record, has climate scientists ringing alarm bells.
Read moreShow less
Davos 2024: China, AI & key topics dominating at the World Economic Forum
Davos 2024: China, AI & key topics dominating at the World Economic Forum | Ian Bremmer | Quick Take

Davos 2024: China, AI & key topics dominating at the World Economic Forum

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take: Hi, everybody. Ian Bremmer here in Davos, Switzerland, for the kickoff of the World Economic Forum, 54th annual, though I haven’t been coming for quite that long. Lots going on here, of course, lots of concerns given ongoing wars as backdrop.

The big story so far, I would say, is that the Chinese are in force, 140 members of the delegation, ten ministers showing up, all with economic portfolios, and they want to engage. This is about a near state visit with the Swiss government, a trade agreement, and basically talking to a bunch of foreign direct investors, many of whom are saying, “Hey, we don't think you guys are so investible; we're going more into India and Vietnam and Mexico.” And the Chinese recognizing that they need to put up and make life easier for them. That has been interesting.

Read moreShow less

Subscribe to our free newsletter, GZERO Daily

Latest