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Political Violence Getting Normalized in the US | World In :60 | GZERO Media

Who cares if Elon Musk bought Twitter?

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

Might Congress take actions against members of Congress who play down threats for political reasons?

I suspect not. Obviously very disturbing that we are so tribal, we are so polarized that when you see political violence against people like Nancy Pelosi, the Paul Pelosi thing, knocked unconscious by a hammer, a guy goes into his house... And Gabby Giffords and Steve Scalise. This is getting normalized in the United States, and it should never be normalized. And in part it is because if it doesn't happen to your side, you don't pay attention to it. It's not such a big deal. That's not where the country needs to be, but it is where we are presently given just how dysfunctional this feeling of, "If you're not with me, you're my enemy," politically inside the United States. This is a natural impact of that occurring.

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Chinese Power | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Chinese power

Xi Jinping just got a rare third term as the head of China's ruling Communist Party. But having so much power comes with big tradeoffs and implications for China — and the rest of the world.

Zero-COVID is saving Chinese lives, yet killing the Chinese economy. And the West is wary of Xi's increasingly muscular foreign policy.

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer speaks to Antoine van Agtmael, the investor who coined the term "emerging markets" and knows a thing or two about China. His prediction: that the 21st century will be a Chinese Century, with Washington playing second fiddle to Beijing.

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Xi Jinping, the All-Powerful | GZERO World

Xi Jinping tightens his grip on China

Who's the most powerful person on the planet right now? Xi Jinping, who just got a third term as boss of China's ruling Communist Party and got all his loyalists appointed to the CCP's top decision-making body.

But having so much power comes with big tradeoffs.

Zero-COVID is devastating the Chinese economy. And Xi is feeling the heat from his increasingly muscular foreign policy.

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China's Chilling Future | Quick Take | GZERO Media

Xi Jinping shaping China's chilling future

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take: Hi everybody. Ian Bremmer here. A Quick Take to kick off your week. All sorts of things going on, but I want to focus on China because that is the most world-changing of the issues that are on our plate right now. Xi Jinping, breaking through term limits, securing for himself, not surprisingly, a third term as General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party. He is today, without question, the most powerful human being on the planet. And that should concern us in the sense that the system is incredibly opaque.

There are increasingly not effective checks and balances on his authority. It is also not aligned with the future that so many in the world are hoping for when it comes to the way that political and economic systems should function - rule of law, transparency, human rights. And I'm not suggesting that the United States has always been a shining example of all of those things, but certainly, you don't have the level of concentration of power in the US or any democracy that you presently have in authoritarian regimes, and particularly right now in China.

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China Will Be Exactly The Same With Xi Securing His Third Term | World In :60 | GZERO Media

Under Xi's third term, China will stay exactly the same

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In 60 Seconds.

Will China become more assertive with Xi securing his third term?

I don't think so. I think it's going to be pretty much exactly the same. Okay everyone's going to be watching whether you get technocrats in key economic positions or not. If you do, they're going to say, "Oh, it's going to be more balanced." If you don't, they're going to say, "Xi's going to crack down." In reality, he's in charge and he's been in charge and he is going to be in charge. And that really means driving a more domestically focused economy with more local supply chain, more focused on local consumption, and more state capitalism probably means a little bit less productivity and efficiency as well. Plus zero-COVID keeps going, so I don't think it changes that much.

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The logo of the Nord Stream 2 natural gas pipeline project is seen at a rolling plant in Chelyabinsk, Russia.

REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

What We're Watching: Russian gas pipeline problems, China's economic slump, the other mobilization

Did someone blow up the Nord Stream pipelines?

The operator of the two Nord Stream gas pipelines, which run from Russia to Western Europe under the Baltic Sea, reported “unprecedented” leaks and massive pressure drops on Tuesday, stoking fears of foul play. Nord Stream was not actually carrying gas to Europe at the time — the EU froze approvals for the new Nord Stream 2 line after Russia invaded Ukraine, and Russia halted existing flows through Nord Stream 1 in August, blaming Western sanctions. But the incident comes as Europe bundles up for winter with substantially reduced shipments of Russian gas. Seismologists recorded explosions in the area on Monday, and European officials have suggested sabotage, but so far there is no hard evidence. Russian officials, for their part, lamented the incident’s impact on “energy security,” while some pro-government outlets have suggested American sabotage. If it were deliberate, who’d benefit most from blowing up a non-operational pipeline? Apart from the geopolitical intrigue, there are environmental concerns too — the line is now leaking gargantuan amounts of methane, churning up the sea off the Danish island of Bornholm.

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An Iranian woman living in Turkey, Istanbul, after she cut her hair during a protest following the death of Mahsa Amini.

Reuters

What We're Watching: Iran protests spread, Putin mobilizes, NY sues Trumps, China faces slow growth

Iranian protests swell

Protests across Iran have now spread to 15 cities – and countries including Turkey, the US, and Germany – after a 22-year-old woman was apprehended and beaten to death by the Islamic Republic’s morality police. Mahsa Amini, from the western Kurdish region, was arrested in Tehran last week for failing to comply with the regime’s stringent hair-covering requirements. She died in custody last Friday. Women around the country have responded by burning their headscarves and cutting their hair in public displays of opposition to the oppressive treatment of women. What’s more, the hacker collective “Anonymous” has thrown its support behind the protests, which have led to at least three deaths and dozens of injuries. “Anonymous” says it hacked two government websites, including one focused on publishing government news (propaganda). Iranian officials claim the young woman died in custody from preexisting conditions and that it was investigating the case. But they also blamed foreign countries and opposition groups for the growing unrest. Meanwhile, Iran’s President Ebrahim Raisi heads back to Tehran on Thursday after addressing the UN General Assembly in New York. We’re watching to see whether the crackdown on protesters, the biggest since the 2009 Green Movement was violently quashed by Iranian forces, will intensify once Raisi is out of the international spotlight.

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell arrives to testify before the US Senate.

Tom Williams via REUTERS

What We're Watching: US Fed's next move, China's stimulus, Chile's president needs a win

All eyes on Powell at Jackson Hole

Updated Aug. 26: Heard of Jackson Hole, Wyoming? That's where all the economic bigwigs from around the world are gathering for an annual three-day event focused on the state of the global economy. In a stark departure from his position throughout much of the pandemic that inflation would be “transitory,” US Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said in a keynote address Friday that there would be “some pain” for households and businesses in the months ahead, noting that inflation continues to soar. Powell also said it’s likely that we’ll see a “softening of labor market conditions,” suggesting that record low unemployment – the current silver lining of the economy – could tick upwards. Indeed, the Fed chair sought to defend his track record to economists and central bankers, many of whom have been critical of him for waiting too long to raise interest rates. Many observers took Powell’s address as a sign that the Fed will continue to tighten monetary policy in the months ahead as inflation tops 8% over the previous year. What's more, some economists say the Fed could soon raise rates as high as 4% (its current target rate is 2.25-2.5%), sparking fears of a sharp recession. Still, inflation is mild in the US compared to parts of Europe, particularly the UK, where inflation is estimated to hit a whopping 18.6% early next year.

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