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Security flaws in China’s My2022 Olympics app could allow surveillance

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

Does the Beijing 2022 Olympics app have security flaws?

Well, the researchers at the Citizen Lab of the University of Toronto do believe so. And if their revelations, this time, will set off a similar storm as they did with the forensics on NSO Group's spyware company, then there will be trouble ahead for China. The researchers found that the official My2022 app for the sports event, which attendees are actually required to download and to use for documenting their health status, has flaws in the security settings. Loopholes they found could be used for intrusion and surveillance.

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Can political leadership prevent cyberattacks in 2022?

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

What are the positive changes in 2022 that we might expect to see in the cyber world?

Well, my hope is that more awareness of the harms of cyberattacks and intrusions on people will lead to stronger political leadership towards better prevention and accountability. Because too often criminals or states that attack others for their own gains simply get away with it. Only when we appreciate that the digital realm is not a universe detached from our own lives, and that attacks lead to patients sent away at hospitals, to food not reaching grocery stores, or fuel not being available at gas stations, we see more political concern over the systemic weakness throughout the technological system and ecosystem. We use both in everyday, mundane context or in very sensitive ones.


Biggest cybersecurity threat to watch in 2022

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

What do you foresee to be the biggest cyber threat and crisis for the year 2022?

Well, to me, the blind trust in commercially made software and technologies, remains an enormous systems risk, because over and over again, we hear of vulnerabilities in thus far, unknown small elements of widely used software that is weaponized.

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Spyware concerns prompt US Congress to move toward sanctions

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

After years of inaction from lawmakers, there are now louder and louder calls in Congress for sanctions of spyware companies. Even those from Israel, which is remarkable because it has a strong surveillance industry, but also has been a strong ally for the United States.

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Biden's Summit for Democracy gets slow start on tech concerns

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

What is the goal of the Summit for Democracy?

President Biden ran his campaign for the soul of the nation and wanted to show the world at the same time that America is back. So the idea of having better cooperation between democracies is one with growing support, especially given the rise of authoritarianism, but also attacks on civil society and the use of technologies for repression and harm to democracy directly.

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How North Korea trains its “cyber soldiers”

How did North Korea, a country with extremely restricted access to the internet, get so good at hacking? It's one of the best ways, says veteran Korea correspondent Jean Lee, to get cash while covering your tracks in order to keep the elite happy and the nuclear program going. "Sanctions and border closures won't matter if you're adept at cyber." Watch a clip from Lee's interview with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Watch this episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer: The Korean Peninsula from K-Pop to Kim Jong-un

Subscribe to GZERO on YouTube to be the first to see new episodes of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer: http://bit.ly/2TxCVnY

Amazon satellites and Project Kuiper: next steps in Big Tech space race

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

Amazon is to launch its first two internet satellites in 2022. Is Big Tech leading the new space race?

Well, yep. In many ways it is. Amazon is not only launching its CEO up there, but also satellites that would offer internet access for people all over the world, and that is a combination with infrastructure on the ground. This way, Amazon will try to open up more access and markets for its own services in developing countries that are yet untapped.

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Russian hackers target US tech companies with little accountability

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

Has Russian behavior in cyber changed after President Biden and President Putin's meeting earlier this year?

Well, unfortunately, we see ongoing assertiveness and aggression from the Russian side, targeting the US government, but also US tech companies. And the fact that there is so little accountability probably keeps motivating. Shortly before the Russian elections, Apple and Google removed an app built by opposition parties, to help voters identify the best candidate to challenge Putin's party. The company cited pressure on their employees in Russia, but of course, the pressure on the Russian population is constant. And after these dramatic events, the silence from Western governments was deafening.

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