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Marjorie Taylor Greene support in House shows Republican Party tilt

Get insights on the latest news in US politics from Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington:

Lots of drama to start the year on Capitol Hill. First, you had an insurgency on January 6th, followed by an impeachment of the President of the United States, accompanied by magnetometers being installed on the floor of the House of Representatives because the Democratic members thought the Republican members were trying to carry in guns with which to hurt them. Accusations that some of the Republican members may have been aiding the insurgents in that 6 January riot. Not a lot of evidence for that, but it does show there's a lot of bad partisan will between the two parties, right now. And that is culminating this week with a vote to potentially expel freshman member Marjorie Taylor Greene from her committee assignments in the House of Representatives.

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Why Republican Congresswoman Nancy Mace voted against impeachment

"I voted to certify the electoral college for the same reason that I voted against impeachment, for Constitutional reasons." Freshman Republican Congresswoman Nancy Mace is not your typical conservative. Though a longtime supporter of President Trump, not only did she vote to certify Joe Biden's electoral win, she also strongly condemned his role in the January 6th Capitol riots. But when it came to impeaching the former president a second time, that, Rep. Mace said, was a bridge too far. She tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World why a vote against impeachment was consistent with her guiding principle of "constitutional conservatism." This episode of GZERO World also features an interview with Democratic Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut.

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