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Ukrainian flag displayed on a laptop and binary code code on a screen.

Jakub Porzycki via Reuters Connect

Why hasn’t Ukraine suffered a debilitating Russian cyberattack?

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February fueled expectations it would launch a devastating campaign of cyberattacks against the neighboring country. Since 2014, state-run Russian cyber units, state-affiliated hackers, and independent cyber-criminal groups have frequently trained their sights on targets in Ukraine. They have, among other things, forced government websites offline, caused the largest-ever cyber-induced blackout of a nation’s power grid, and deployed the most destructive and costly malware to date. So, why hasn’t there been another such attack since the war began? We talked to Eurasia Group geotech analyst Sienna Tompkins to get some answers.

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Podcast: Lessons of the SolarWinds attack


Listen: Two years after the discovery of one of the largest cyber attacks in history, we’re looking at the current state of security for both software and hardware supply chains.

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Identifying cyber threats, urgent priority for tech companies – Microsoft’s Brad Smith | GZERO Media

"We're identifying new cyber threats and attacks every day" – Microsoft’s Brad Smith

Cyber threats are the new frontier of war. That's why companies like Microsoft are investing heavily in the capability to identify new threats and attempted attacks. “We work every day to make sure that we’re identifying new threats and attacks, regardless of where they’re from,” said Microsoft President Brad Smith at the Munich Security Conference. This includes monitoring infiltrations and alerting companies, countries and sometimes even the public, as needed, in a timely fashion, he explained.

Smith spoke with moderator David Sanger in GZERO Media's Global Stage livestream discussion at the Munich Security Conference.

“Massive Cyber Attack” can trigger Article 5, says Deputy Secretary General of NATO | GZERO World

Russian cyber attack could trigger NATO’s Article 5, warns NATO Deputy Secretary General

Mircea Geoană, Deputy Secretary General of NATO, says that when the alliance decided that cyber should be considered an “operational domain,” the bloc also made the call that a “massive cyber attack” on one member state could trigger Article 5 of NATO’s Washington Treaty. This strikes at the heart of the alliance’s defense clause, which states that an attack on one country is considered an attack on all allies.

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Ukraine Under Fire in The Digital Domain | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

Constant Russian attacks on Ukraine in cyberspace

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

What is cyber's role in the Russia-Ukraine crisis?

Well first of all, the world is looking with great concern at the massive buildup of Russian troops and wonders when or how an invasion into Ukrainian territory could be started from that position. But in the digital domain, Ukraine is already under constant fire. When we go back to 2017, the NotPetya attack was aiming at Ukrainian targets and infecting banks, government agencies, as well as media and took down part of the electricity grid.

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Join us live from the 2022 Munich Security Conference

Friday, February 18 at 11 am ET / 5 pm CET: Watch GZERO Media and Microsoft's live conversation from the 2022 Munich Security Conference.

As crises converge, our speakers will discuss emerging risks at the intersection of technology, policy and security: NATO's role and tools to defend democracy, the US role in global alliances, the rise of cyber threats and the need for cyber norms and stronger defenses.

Participants:

  • David E. Sanger, White House and national security correspondent, The New York Times (moderator)
  • Ian Bremmer, President and Founder, Eurasia Group and GZERO Media
  • Benedikt Franke, Chief Executive Officer, Munich Security Conference
  • Mircea Geoană, Deputy Secretary General, NATO
  • Kersti Kaljulaid, former President of Estonia
  • Anne-Marie Slaughter, CEO, New America
  • Brad Smith, President and Vice Chair, Microsoft

Event link: gzeromedia.com/globalstage

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What Will Be the Biggest Cyber Threats in 2022? | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

Biggest cybersecurity threat to watch in 2022

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

What do you foresee to be the biggest cyber threat and crisis for the year 2022?

Well, to me, the blind trust in commercially made software and technologies, remains an enormous systems risk, because over and over again, we hear of vulnerabilities in thus far, unknown small elements of widely used software that is weaponized.

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Placeholder | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

QUAD supply chain strategy to consider values; new AI-powered weapons

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

How will the QUAD leaders address the microchip supply chain issue during their meeting this week?

Well, the idea for leaders of the US, Japan, India, and Australia, is to collaborate more intensively on building secure supply chains for semiconductors, and that is in response to China's growing assertiveness. I think it's remarkable to see that values are becoming much more clearly articulated by world leaders when they're talking about governing advanced technologies. The current draft statement ahead of the QUAD meeting says that collaboration should be based on the rule of respecting human rights.

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