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Ukrainian flag displayed on a laptop and binary code code on a screen.

Jakub Porzycki via Reuters Connect

Why hasn’t Ukraine suffered a debilitating Russian cyberattack?

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February fueled expectations it would launch a devastating campaign of cyberattacks against the neighboring country. Since 2014, state-run Russian cyber units, state-affiliated hackers, and independent cyber-criminal groups have frequently trained their sights on targets in Ukraine. They have, among other things, forced government websites offline, caused the largest-ever cyber-induced blackout of a nation’s power grid, and deployed the most destructive and costly malware to date. So, why hasn’t there been another such attack since the war began? We talked to Eurasia Group geotech analyst Sienna Tompkins to get some answers.

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Join us live from the 2022 Munich Security Conference

Friday, February 18 at 11 am ET / 5 pm CET: Watch GZERO Media and Microsoft's live conversation from the 2022 Munich Security Conference.

As crises converge, our speakers will discuss emerging risks at the intersection of technology, policy and security: NATO's role and tools to defend democracy, the US role in global alliances, the rise of cyber threats and the need for cyber norms and stronger defenses.

Participants:

  • David E. Sanger, White House and national security correspondent, The New York Times (moderator)
  • Ian Bremmer, President and Founder, Eurasia Group and GZERO Media
  • Benedikt Franke, Chief Executive Officer, Munich Security Conference
  • Mircea Geoană, Deputy Secretary General, NATO
  • Kersti Kaljulaid, former President of Estonia
  • Anne-Marie Slaughter, CEO, New America
  • Brad Smith, President and Vice Chair, Microsoft

Event link: gzeromedia.com/globalstage

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Facebook — OFF

Has a single tech malfunction ever affected quite as many people as this? You do the math, but on Monday an unexplained outage at Facebook left some 3.5 billion users worldwide without access to the social media site, its messaging app WhatsApp, and the photo sharing site Instagram.

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Personal Data Risks With TikTok | Tesla Driverless Cars Investigation | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

Personal data risks with TikTok; Tesla driverless cars investigation

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

Beijing took a stake and a board seat in TikTok owner ByteDance's key Chinese entity. Should I worry about my data on TikTok?

Now, being concerned about where your data ends up is always a good idea, but for underage children, many of whom love video-sharing apps and social media, that question is even more sensitive. And for apps that end up being accessible by governments, and essentially most of them are, you want to be aware of what you share. I recall an account of an American teenager being shut down as they highlighted the human rights violations of Uyghurs in Xinjiang, which is, of course, something that should be highlighted and it's troubling that the video-sharing company intervenes on behalf of a Chinese state agenda.

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QR Codes and the Risk to Your Personal Data | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

QR codes and the risk to your personal data

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

QR codes are everywhere. Are they also tracking my personal data?

Well, a QR code is like a complex barcode that may be on a printed ad or product package for you to scan and access more information. For example, to look at a menu without health risk or for two-factor verification of a bank payment. And now also as an integral part of covid and vaccine registration. QR codes can lead to tracking metadata or personal data. And when your phone scans and takes you to a website, certainly the tracking starts there. Now, one big trap is that people may not distinguish one kind of use of QR codes from another and that they cannot be aware of the risks of sharing their data.

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US, NATO, & EU Condemn China's Microsoft Hack; Pegasus Spyware Leak | Cyber In :60s | GZERO Media

US, NATO, & EU condemn China's Microsoft hack; Pegasus spyware leak

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

The US, NATO, and the EU have all condemned China for its hack of Microsoft Exchange servers. What happens next?

Now, the joint statement sends a strong signal, but there are operational steps that need to be clarified. Firstly, why was it possible to hack Microsoft servers at all and how to close the gaps to make software more resilient? Additionally, governments making statements condemning China or others are well-advised to attach consequences to such attributions. Sanctions of the economic, financial or immigration type, as well as restrictions on state-owned enterprises, should all be on the table. Certainly, clear criteria need to be there with regard to responsible behavior and the application of international law in cyberspace.

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Ian Bremmer: US & Allies Unite Against China's Cyberattacks | Quick Take | GZERO Media

US & allies unite against China's cyberattacks

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Hi, everybody. Ian Bremmer here, back in Nantucket for a few days, and a Quick Take to start out the week.Well, I thought I would talk about the finger-pointing happening at China for these cyberattacks. When we've been talking about cyberattacks recently, we mostly talk about Russia. It's been ransomware, it's been espionage, it's been disinformation, and US election intervention and all of these things. But no, this week it is all about China, and specifically the White House had this unusually strong statement, citing concerns about China's, what they call, irresponsible and destabilizing behavior in cyberspace, specifically talking about a hack against the Microsoft Exchange Server that we found out about back in March. That is a big deal.

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Report: China’s Cyber Security a Decade Behind the US Despite Hype | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

Report: China's cyber security a decade behind the US, despite hype

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

Question one, a recent study suggests China's cyber capabilities are a decade behind the United States. Is China really that far behind?

Well, the IISS report assessed that China is behind in cyber security, making it relatively vulnerable. But that does not change the cyber capacity and most of all, the willingness to use its tools to gain access to information through stealthy intrusion. At the same time, China benefits from an image of having great digital and cyber capabilities and of being on the cusp of global dominance. This notion of a race between China and the US we often hear about when discussing A.I., greatly benefits those who are able to gain more investments and government support from this image. So in light of opportunistic hypes, reality checks and independent research are most helpful.

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