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Watch live on May 18: Securing Cyberspace

Cyber is a tool, and sometimes a weapon. Whether espionage for commercial gain or indiscriminate attacks on critical infrastructure, actions taken in cyber space affect you directly, potentially upending even the most mundane realities of everyday life.

Join GZERO Media and Microsoft for a live conversation on cyber challenges facing governments, companies, and citizens in a Munich Security Conference "Road to Munich" event on Tuesday, May 18.

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Apple vs Facebook, a clash of the tech titans; social media algorithms scrutiny

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

How big of a blow is Apple's new privacy feature to companies like Facebook, who depend on tracking users?

The long-awaited update, including enhanced privacy features, actually empowers those users to decide not to be tracked. So that's great news for people who are sick of how the data trail they leave behind on the web is used. But it has to be said, that simple feature settings changed by Apple cannot solve the problem of misuse of data and microtargeting alone. Still, Apple's move was met with predictable outrage and anti-trust accusations from ad giant Facebook. I would anticipate more standard setting by companies in the absence of a federal data protection law in the United States. That's just to mention one vacuum that big tech thrives on.

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US joins in call to regulate Big Tech; EU proposes AI tech regulation

Get insights on the latest news about emerging trends in cyberspace from Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford University's Cyber Policy Center and former European Parliamentarian:

This week we talk about one of my favorite topics, regulation. Laws are often framed as a barrier to innovation and not always recognized as a key enabler of freedoms and the protection of rights. But what's more is that regulation is a process, and one that can have tons of different outcomes. So, being in favor or against regulation doesn't mean anything. Except that those who oppose any changes are apparently benefiting from the status quo.

Is the world at a tipping point when it comes to regulating big tech?

And I would say absolutely. The outsized power of big tech is recognized more broadly because the harms are so blatantly clear. Harms to democracy, public health, but also to fairness in the economy are all related to the outsized power of unaccountable and under-regulated big tech. Now, what's significant is that this debate has finally hit home in the United States after it was already recognized as a problem in many other parts of the world.

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Impact of Microsoft hack deepens; why cyber attacks target healthcare

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford University's Cyber Policy Center and former European Parliamentarian, shares insights on the latest news about big tech, privacy protection and emerging trends in cyberspace.

What is the deal with the recently revealed Microsoft hack?

Well, it's the second hack of historic proportions after SolarWinds. At first, it was considered a targeted Chinese effort to go after individuals critical to the state. But last week we saw escalations with victims now estimated in the tens, if not hundreds of thousands. And the US government CISA called on all organizations in all sectors to follow guidance and to patch the vulnerabilities that are being exploited, even if that does not stop already gained access by hackers.

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Evaluating Data Privacy & Regulation in the US

How much regulation and oversight should the US government have when it comes to big tech? In an interview with Ian Bremmer for GZERO World, Marietje Schaake, former member of EU Parliament and international policy director of the Cyber Policy Center at Stanford University, argues that government relies on private tech firms for much of its own tech and data infrastructure, and that could be against the interest of citizens and consumers. Using examples of election security and misinformation promulgated in the COVID-19 pandemic, Schaake discusses the competing nature of profit-driven advertising platforms and the public good.

Data privacy before and after a pandemic

Some economists have argued that data is the new oil, a precious commodity driving exponential growth of some of the biggest multinational corporations. This week, our guest says it could also be the new CO2, quietly changing the world in irreparable ways if not properly controlled.

On the latest episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer, a look at the ongoing debate about data and how it's used by governments and big tech companies in ways both helpful and harmful. The policy conversation was complicated before COVID-19, as Europe established its General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the US begins to grapple with similar laws, like California's Consumer Privacy Act.

Our guest, Marietje Schaake, former EU Parliament Member and international policy director of Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, argues that more regulation is necessary to curb unchecked use of consumer data. Taped just days before many US cities entered lockdown in the COVID-19 pandemic, the interview also examines early uses of tracking and surveillance in Singapore and China, and what those actions foreshadow for the US as the nation balances freedom and security.

Later in the program, contact tracing and COVID-19: A conversation with epidemiologist John Brownstein about his site CovidNearYou.org.

And on Puppet Regime: Dating is hard during a pandemic. Even for pathogens on the prowl.

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