Russia-Ukraine: Two years of war
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F-16s for Ukraine redefine red line for Putin (again)
TITLE PLACEHOLDER | World In :60 | GZERO Media

F-16s for Ukraine redefine red line for Putin (again)

Will Biden's reversal to allow F-16s to Ukraine be a game-changer? What is holding up a debt ceiling deal? Will the EU's lawsuit against Meta lead to a data-sharing agreement with the United States? Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

Will Biden's reversal to allow F-16s to Ukraine be a game-changer?

Well, Putin says it is. Says that that would absolutely be a line that would be crossed and be irreversible. Of course, he said that about a bunch of things, and his credibility in a response to NATO providing defense to Ukraine has been significantly eroding over the last year. Of course, we also see not just F-16s, but we see Ukrainian armored troop carriers suddenly five miles deep in Russian territory, in Belgorod. The Ukrainians say it wasn't them, but they're very happy to embarrass Putin over that. Look, a lot of things that would've been seen as red lines six months ago now are not. Of course, that's good for the Ukrainians, but it also does mean that the tail risk dangers of this conflict are also going up.

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How GDPR protects your social media data (even if you accept all cookies)
How GDPR Protects Your Social Media Data (Even If You Accept All Cookies) | GZERO World

How GDPR protects your social media data (even if you accept all cookies)

Why are apps and websites increasingly asking us if we're willing to share our cookies?

The EU's General Data Protection Regulation may be somewhat annoying to the average consumer, but for social media companies it was a wakeup call about the huge amount of private data they'd accumulated, says Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen.

And that's a slippery slope for the likes of Facebook or Google.

"One of the things that you get as part of GDPR is the right to request any data that a company has on you," Haugen tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

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What happens in Europe, doesn’t stay in Europe — why EU social media regulation matters to you
Why EU Social Media Regulation Matters To You | GZERO World

What happens in Europe, doesn’t stay in Europe — why EU social media regulation matters to you

The EU just approved the Digital Services Act, which for the first time will mandate social media companies come clean about what they do with our data.

Okay, but perhaps you don't live there. Why should you care?

First, transparency matters, says Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen.

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Health data privacy is the next post-Roe fight
Health Data Privacy Is the Next Post-Roe Fight | GZERO World

Health data privacy is the next post-Roe fight

Now that the US Supreme Court has ruled that states can do their own thing on abortion rights, women are worried about who can check their online personal health data.

Apps have been a game-changer for American women tracking their menstrual cycles, ovulation, or pregnancy status. But that information could be used against them where abortion is illegal.

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Join us live from the 2022 Munich Security Conference

Friday, February 18 at 11 am ET / 5 pm CET: Watch GZERO Media and Microsoft's live conversation from the 2022 Munich Security Conference.

As crises converge, our speakers will discuss emerging risks at the intersection of technology, policy and security: NATO's role and tools to defend democracy, the US role in global alliances, the rise of cyber threats and the need for cyber norms and stronger defenses.

Participants:

  • David E. Sanger, White House and national security correspondent, The New York Times (moderator)
  • Ian Bremmer, President and Founder, Eurasia Group and GZERO Media
  • Benedikt Franke, Chief Executive Officer, Munich Security Conference
  • Mircea Geoană, Deputy Secretary General, NATO
  • Kersti Kaljulaid, former President of Estonia
  • Anne-Marie Slaughter, CEO, New America
  • Brad Smith, President and Vice Chair, Microsoft

Event link: gzeromedia.com/globalstage

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Europe and the US can’t agree on how to regulate Big Tech
Will Political Polarization Stop Big Tech Regulation | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

Europe and the US can’t agree on how to regulate Big Tech

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

Are we running out of time to regulate big tech?

And to that I would say yes and no. So let me explain. Yes, because especially in the US, the legislative responses to the outsized and growing power of big tech have been incredibly slow. Over the past several years, we have seen initiatives being drafted, but when it came to that point, the polarization between Democrats and Republicans have been running so deep that hardly any of the legislative ideas have actually come to adoption. And there's no real expectation that that will change soon. But we are not running out of time, but actually catching up, in the sense that elsewhere in the world, for example, in the EU, a series of proposals are being made and adopted. To foster more competition, to ensure greater responsibility from tech companies on content moderation, on AI, data, political ads, rights and principles, cybersecurity, and so on. And these proposals do add up to a shift in the status quo and certainly regulate the effects of big tech.

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Security flaws in China’s My2022 Olympics app could allow surveillance
China's My2022 App Flaws Compromise Security with Surveillance Threats | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

Security flaws in China’s My2022 Olympics app could allow surveillance

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

Does the Beijing 2022 Olympics app have security flaws?

Well, the researchers at the Citizen Lab of the University of Toronto do believe so. And if their revelations, this time, will set off a similar storm as they did with the forensics on NSO Group's spyware company, then there will be trouble ahead for China. The researchers found that the official My2022 app for the sports event, which attendees are actually required to download and to use for documenting their health status, has flaws in the security settings. Loopholes they found could be used for intrusion and surveillance.

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The US and EU further talks on technology governance
The US and EU Further Trade and Technology Talks | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

The US and EU further talks on technology governance

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

Hello, and welcome to the new Cyber In 60 Seconds. My name is Marietje Schaake, and you're finding me at the Democracy Forum in Athens. So, from my hotel room, I'm looking back at the Trade and Technology Council that took place in Pittsburgh this week.

For those who missed it, this gathering brought together high-level officials from the Biden administration and the European Commission. It was a long-anticipated meeting that was supposed to reach conclusions about a shared governance agenda for tech-related issues like AI, data, semiconductors, and foreign direct investments. But the Trade and Technology Council was also expected and hoped to mark a new start after very difficult years across the Atlantic. I think we all remember the years when President Trump was still in the White House. And thankfully, the August fallout and French anger did not end up pouring cold water over the events. Although, the general sentiment in Europe that the honeymoon weeks are over is widely shared.

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