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What Abortion Will Look Like in Different US States | GZERO World

Why permitting some abortion is smart politics

Since the SCOTUS Roe v. Wade ruling was leaked a couple of months ago, the GOP has refrained from putting Republican-led states on an abortion "purity test," says New York Times columnist Emily Bazelon.

Why? Because the majority of Americans believe abortion should be legal in some cases — but not all.

"Everything depends on where you draw the line," Bazelon tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

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The End of Roe | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

US Supreme Court fights: why ending Roe is only the beginning

The US is now a much more divided country than it was almost 50 years ago, when the Supreme Court granted the constitutional right to abortion — recently overturned by the court.

Interestingly, most of the rest of the world is moving in the opposite direction, including in majority-Catholic countries. But striking down Roe v. Wade will surely have a bigger impact on US politics.

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer speaks to New York Times columnist Emily Bazelon, who knows a thing or two about this ultra-divisive issue because she's also a senior research fellow at Yale Law School.

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Podcast: An active US Supreme Court overturns "settled law" on abortion. What's next?

Listen: Americans now live in a much more divided country — as has been on full display after the US Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and removed the constitutional right to an abortion, while the rest of the world - including largely Catholic countries in Latin America and Europe - is moving in the opposite direction. But the SCOTUS ruling is already making waves around the world.

On the GZERO World podcast, Ian Bremmer speaks to New York Times columnist and senior research fellow at Yale Law School, Emily Bazelon, who knows a thing or two about abortion law.

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West Virginia v. EPA Ruling To Affect Climate Change Regulations | US Politics In :60 | GZERO Media

West Virginia v. EPA ruling hampers climate change action

Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, DC, shares his analysis on US politics:

This week's question, what are the implications of the Supreme Court's decision in the case of West Virginia v. EPA?

It's been a busy term for the Supreme Court, topped off this week with a ruling on the EPA's ability to regulate carbon emissions under the Clean Air Act.

The Supreme Court ruled that the EPA did not have the properly congressionally delegated authority to regulate carbon emissions. This will hamper the ability of the Biden administration to act on climate change in the absence of congressional action, which we do not expect. And more broadly could have implications for other agencies, such as the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission.

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Roe v. Wade Overturned: Abortion Restricted in Half of US States | GZERO World

Roe v. Wade overturned: Abortion restricted in half of US states

Now that the US Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, roughly half the states have legislation on the books restricting abortion.

And 13 of them had "trigger laws" to ban abortion once the 1973 ruling was struck down. Residents of those states seeking abortions must now travel across state lines to get an abortion — and Missouri wants to sue those who do.

What's more, it'll be a long drive: an average of 125 miles, compared to just 25 when Roe was still the law of the land, Ian Bremmer explains on GZERO World.

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Mother and daughter outside the US Supreme Court.

REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein

Abortion pills are the next frontier

Roe v. Wade is dead, but the abortion debate in America lives on.

Since it became clear two months ago that the demise of the landmark 1973 decision was inevitable, the contours of the abortion debate have shifted.

Even before Roe’s reversal by the Supreme Court on Friday, access to surgical abortions – those involving a vaginal procedure – had already been severely curtailed in many parts of the country. Now they will be very difficult to obtain in at least half of all states. As a result, medical abortions – a less invasive method that involves swallowing a pill – have become the new frontier in the battle over reproductive rights and access in America.

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Paige Fusco

The Graphic Truth: America's increased use of abortion pills

In little over 20 years, abortion pills have gone from being illegal to the most popular way for Americans to get abortions. But now that Roe v. Wade has been overturned, it's unclear whether or how US states that ban abortion will block access to medication abortions. We take a look at how abortion pill usage has progressed in recent decades.

Abortion-rights activists protest outside the US Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v Wade.

REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein

What We’re Watching: The future of abortion in America, Madrid hosts NATO summit

US states fight over post-Roe abortion rights

In case you've been living under a rock, on Friday the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade, the landmark ruling that protected abortion rights in America for almost 50 years. The decision, as expected, caused an outcry among abortion-rights activists and sparked jubilation for those in the anti-abortion camp. Now, the center of attention shifts to individual US states since 13 Republican-led ones had so-called "trigger laws" to prohibit or severely restrict abortion in case Roe was overturned. Although the verdict is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states, when and how those laws will go into effect — and potential legal challenges to them — make the timeline hard to predict. Conversely, several states governed by Democrats are taking steps to codify Roe into law, ushering in an uncertain period of legal fights between states to determine whether those who perform and assist abortions can be prosecuted out-of-state, and over access to anti-abortion pills. Politically, the ruling is a double-edged sword for the GOP, which hopes it'll fire up social conservatives, but also fears the Dems could use the verdict to energize their own base and make inroads with suburban women in swing states ahead of the November midterms. Moreover, the ruling has already become a major battleground of the larger culture wars for corporate America.

Check out more of our coverage on the historic SCOTUS reversal:

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