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The major Supreme Court decisions to watch for in June
The major Supreme Court decisions to watch for in June | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

The major Supreme Court decisions to watch for in June

In June, the US Supreme Court will begin issuing decisions on cases involving everything from reproductive rights to gun ownership to homeless encampments to former president Donald Trump’s criminal cases. Yale Law School Lecturer and staff writer at the New York Times Magazine Emily Bazelon joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to unpack some of the biggest cases on the docket this year and what’s at stake in some of the major decisions expected to come down next month.

This year’s SCOTUS term comes at a time when approval for the Court is at an all-time low. As of September of 2023, a record 58% of Americans disapproved of how the Court handles its job. That follows multiple ethics scandals involving Associate Justice Clarence Thomas and a string of conservative decisions, including the 2022 Dobbs decision striking down the right to abortion, increasingly out of step with public opinion. With the Court wading into the 2024 election and former President Trump’s immunity claims, it risks being seen by the public as even more partisan and politicized.

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Ian Explains: Does it matter if Americans don't trust the Supreme Court?
Ian Explains: Does it matter if Americans don't trust the Supreme Court? | GZERO World

Ian Explains: Does it matter if Americans don't trust the Supreme Court?

Public approval for the US Supreme Court is at an all-time low. But how much does that matter really? On Ian Explains, Ian Bremmer breaks down why voters believe the Court has become more partisan and politically motivated in recent years and whether public perception makes any difference in how it operates.

According to Gallup polling, SCOTUS has had a strong net approval rating, much higher than the President and Congress, for most of the last 25 years. But as of September 2023, 58% of Americans disapproved of the Supreme Court, a record high. The Court’s credibility has come under fire following ethics scandals involving Justice Clarence Thomas and a string of 6-3 conservative majority opinions, like the June 2022 Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization decision overturning Roe v. Wade, increasingly out of step with public opinion.

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Who cares if the Supreme Court justices like each other?
Bazelon: Who cares if the Supreme Court Justices like each other? | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Who cares if the Supreme Court justices like each other?

Yale legal scholar and New York Times Magazine staff writer Emily Bazelon wants to have faith in the Supreme Court. "I want to have a good faith belief in the justices' approach to these cases” she tells Ian Bremmer in a new episode of GZERO World. But in a wide-ranging conversation in which Bazelon and Bremmer preview the major cases facing the Supreme Court this spring, Bazelon confesses that the past few years have tested her faith.

“After a certain number of cases come out particular ways, you start to feel like cynicism is realism about the Court."

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U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Clarence Thomas poses during a group portrait at the Supreme Court in Washington, U.S., October 7, 2022.

REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein/File Photo

SCOTUS adopts new ethics code as public trust plummets

The US Supreme Court on Monday issued a formal code of conduct for its nine justices following allegations of serious ethics violations, mostly concerning Justice Clarence Thomas.

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Why Clarence Thomas has eroded trust in the US Supreme Court
Why Clarence Thomas has eroded trust in the US Supreme Court | GZERO Media

Why Clarence Thomas has eroded trust in the US Supreme Court

Few Supreme Court Justices have tested the Court's ethical limits like Justice Clarence Thomas, says this week's GZERO World guest, Yale Law School legal expert Emily Bazelon. And that's because, for centuries, Justices have been reluctant to test the boundaries of an ethical system that has few limits. "Federal judges and lower courts are subject to ethical codes," Bazelon explains, "but not the Supreme Court justices themselves."

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Who polices the Supreme Court?
E550 cutdown | GZERO Media

Who polices the Supreme Court?

Who watches the watchmen? And who oversees the US Supreme Court? As SCOTUS, the highest court in the US, gears up to issue some blockbuster rulings this summer, ethical concerns swirl around its members, and its public support is at an all-time low.

It’s been one year since SCOTUS struck down Roe v. Wade, eliminating the constitutional right to abortion after 50 years of precedent. In the months following the decision, the conservative supermajority quickly moved US law away from the political center. Multiple controversies erupted surrounding Justice Clarence Thomas, and public opinion balked at a blanket refusal to address questions about the justices’ ethical standard.

Has the Supreme Court become overly politicized? Can public faith be restored in a deeply partisan America? And what major rulings are still to come this session? Ian Bremmer talks with Yale Law School legal expert, New York Times Magazine columnist and co-host of the Slate’s Political Gabfest podcast, Emily Bazelon.

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Podcast: (Un)packing the Supreme Court with Yale Law's Emily Bazelon

Transcript

Listen: The Supreme Court, one of the three branches of government that makes up this country's democratic system of checks and balances, doesn't have a military. As a result, when its justices make a ruling, they are counting on a strong sense of public trust to ensure their decisions are carried out. Not all countries on this planet can count on that public trust, and with popular support for the Court plummeting to record lows, some experts fear that the United States may soon be unable to as well.

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Preet Bharara on the legal troubles of former President Trump
Preet Bharara on the legal troubles of former President Trump | GZERO World

Preet Bharara on the legal troubles of former President Trump

The rule of law is a cornerstone of democracy. Ensuring that everyone is treated equally in the eyes of the law, including public officials, is a critical component of a healthy, thriving democratic government. On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer speaks with former US Attorney for the Southern District of NY and podcast host Preet Bharara to delve into the legal struggles of former President Trump. There is a strong possibility Trump will face a criminal trial as he runs for president in 2024, so the stakes have never been higher.

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