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The Graphic Truth: Abortion laws around the world

While the debate over fetal rights versus a woman’s right to choose is particularly ferocious in the US, it’s also a divisive issue in many parts of the world, particularly in countries where the Roman Catholic Church holds influence. We take a look at abortion laws globally, as well as countries with the highest official abortion rates.

Paige Fusco

What happens after Roe v. Wade is overturned?

The abortion debate, though universal, is also quintessentially American. Over the past 50 years, it has come to represent the increasingly vitriolic culture wars dominating US politics.

The temperature is again super hot after a leaked memo revealed that the US Supreme Court is set to repeal the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

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Supreme Court Hearings Served No Purpose & Could do Harm | US Politics: In60 | GZERO Media

SCOTUS confirmation hearings no longer serve a purpose

Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, discusses the Supreme Court hearings.

Today's question. Have the Supreme Court hearings lost their purpose?

Blanketing cable news this week are the Senate Judiciary hearings to confirm Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court. Brown Jackson surpasses anyone's standard of a qualified Supreme Court justice. She's educated at the best law schools. She's been a Supreme Court clerk, a public defender, a trial court judge, and a circuit court judge. She's at least as qualified as anybody else serving on the court today. And nobody questions that she has a top notch intellect and character to sit on the Court.

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Biden’s Promise to Name a Black Woman to SCOTUS Isn’t Unprecedented | GZERO World

Biden’s promise to name a Black woman to SCOTUS isn’t unprecedented

US President Joe Biden has gotten pushback from some Republicans for honoring his campaign pledge to nominate a Black woman to replace outgoing Justice Breyer on the Supreme Court.

But for Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Clarence Page, how is that different from when Ronald Reagan promised to pick the court's first woman in Sandra Day O'Connor?

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Black women judges in America | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

The history of Black women judges in America

US President Joe Biden says he'll deliver on his campaign pledge to nominate a Black woman to replace retiring Justice Stephen Breyer.

Good opportunity to review the (short) history of Black women on the bench in America. Ian Bremmer takes a look back on GZERO World.

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The Supreme Court’s Role on Black Voting Rights | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

The Supreme Court’s role on Black voting rights

When the 1965 Voting Rights Act was passed, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Clarence Page had just finished high school. This legislation changed the lives of Black people in America because Jim Crow laws had virtually prevented Blacks from voting in the South, he said in an interview with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

But in 2013, the Supreme Court gutted the law by taking away pre-clearance for states, which had blocked states — especially the former Confederate ones — from changing their voting laws based on racial discrimination.

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Biden’s SCOTUS Pick to Replace Breyer Must Appeal to Senate Dems | US Politics In :60 | GZERO Media

Biden’s SCOTUS pick to replace Breyer must appeal to Senate Democrats

What does Stephen Breyer's retirement mean for President Biden? Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, discusses how Biden and the Democrats will likely handle the Supreme Court nomination process.

What does Stephen Breyer's retirement mean for President Biden?

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer announced retirement this week, giving Biden the opportunity to appoint a new justice and maintain the balance on the court, which is currently divided 6-3, favoring Republican appointees. Whoever Biden nominates is extremely unlikely to get even a single Republican vote, but the nominee is likely to come relatively quickly and be confirmed well before Republicans take the Senate in the November midterm elections.

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Why do Americans get so worked up about abortion?

On Wednesday the Supreme Court began hearing arguments on an issue that has had Americans fighting — and in some cases killing — each other for 50 years: abortion.

The court must decide whether a recent Mississippi state law that prohibits abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy is legal and, more broadly, whether it runs counter to the Roe v Wade Supreme Court decision of 1973.

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