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Paige Fusco

What happens after Roe v. Wade is overturned?

The abortion debate, though universal, is also quintessentially American. Over the past 50 years, it has come to represent the increasingly vitriolic culture wars dominating US politics.

The temperature is again super hot after a leaked memo revealed that the US Supreme Court is set to repeal the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

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Roe v. Wade Decision Leaked: Not The Law Of the Land Yet | US Politics In :60 | GZERO Media

SCOTUS leak on abortion decision: impacts midterms and beyond

Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, discusses what the abortion ruling mean for US politics.

What does the abortion ruling mean for US politics?

I'm down here at the Supreme Court where word leaked out last night that the court has a draft opinion that likely has the majority of votes to overturn Roe v. Wade, which is the 50 year old precedent that prevents states from imposing draconian bans on abortion. Democratic states and Republican states have been preparing for this to happen. Republicans have been rushing as quick as they can to put in place new abortion bans, while Democrat states have been enshrining abortion protections in their law, in anticipation of this decision.

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Ketanji Brown Jackson Confirmed, But GOP Dominates SCOTUS | US Politics In :60 | GZERO Media

Ketanji Brown Jackson confirmed, but GOP will dominate SCOTUS for years

Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, discusses the Supreme Court confirmation of Ketanji Brown Jackson.

Today's question, what does the confirmation of Ketanji Brown Jackson mean for the US?

She'll be the first black woman ever to serve on the highest court. What's the political significance of this? Not much. After Republicans took at 6-3 advantage on the court during the Trump administration, the conservatives now have what looks like a durable majority that will dominate the court for years to come. Brown Jackson's vote is unlikely to be decisive in many cases, which frequently split along partisan lines with the six conservative justices aligning in a block against the three liberal justices on issues like separation of powers, the scope of the federal government, and voting rights.

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Biden’s Promise to Name a Black Woman to SCOTUS Isn’t Unprecedented | GZERO World

Biden’s promise to name a Black woman to SCOTUS isn’t unprecedented

US President Joe Biden has gotten pushback from some Republicans for honoring his campaign pledge to nominate a Black woman to replace outgoing Justice Breyer on the Supreme Court.

But for Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Clarence Page, how is that different from when Ronald Reagan promised to pick the court's first woman in Sandra Day O'Connor?

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Black women judges in America | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

The history of Black women judges in America

US President Joe Biden says he'll deliver on his campaign pledge to nominate a Black woman to replace retiring Justice Stephen Breyer.

Good opportunity to review the (short) history of Black women on the bench in America. Ian Bremmer takes a look back on GZERO World.

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U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Stephen Breyer is seen during a group portrait session for the new full court at the Supreme Court in Washington, U.S., November 30, 2018.

REUTERS/Jim Young/File Photo

What We’re Watching: US Supreme Court vacancy, Russians watching Ukraine, China’s Fight Club

Biden gets a Supreme Court pick. US Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer announced on Wednesday that he'll retire later this year, probably before the November midterms. If he does, President Joe Biden will nominate Breyer’s replacement. The nominee will presumably be the first Black woman on the court, as Biden promised during his election campaign. Biden could pick a candidate that can win enthusiastic praise from the progressive wing of his party. That might allow him more political space to rework the Build Back Better spending bill to satisfy the demands of Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema. But first he'll have to persuade the two independent-minded senators to confirm Biden's nominee. The Dems face lengthening odds of retaining their razor-thin majority in the Senate, which confirms US federal judges. Still, Breyer’s decision provides a rare piece of good news for Democrats, who can now ensure the court's ideological balance will not tip further to the right. Later this year, the Supreme Court is expected to rule on major political cases, including challenges to the Roe v Wade ruling on abortion rights.

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US Supreme Court building in Washington, DC.

REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein

What We're Watching: SCOTUS wades into abortion minefield, mercs in Libya, Chinese kids learn how Xi thinks

SCOTUS lights the fuse on a culture war bomb: Texas imposed a near complete ban on abortion on Wednesday, hours after the US Supreme Court declined to rule on whether a law that prohibits the procedure after doctors can detect a fetal "heartbeat" is constitutional. Pro-choice Americans say the law, written by the Republican-controlled Texas legislature, violates the provisions of the landmark 1973 Roe vs Wade, in which the Supreme Court ruled that abortion is, with some caveats, a constitutional right. The law would make it illegal to abort as early as six weeks into pregnancy, in effect outlawing some 85 percent of elective abortions in the state. Although President Biden says he opposes the law and would protect Roe v Wade, he has yet to take any concrete action. SCOTUS could still rule on the law, but the debate around it is certain to be a major third-rail issue in US politics as the 2022 midterms approach. A majority of Americans say abortion should be legal in almost all cases, but the split is sharply partisan: 80 percent of Democrats agree, compared to only 35 percent of Republicans.

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What We’re Watching: SCOTUS immigration ruling, Barbecue runs Haiti quake relief, Eritreans back in Tigray

SCOTUS brings back "Remain in Mexico" policy: The US Supreme Court has ordered the Biden administration to reinstate a Trump-era immigration rule that requires asylum-seekers who attempt to cross the US southern border to wait in Mexico until their applications get processed. This is bad news for Joe Biden for two reasons. First, he cancelled that policy because it failed to accomplish its stated goal of reducing processing backlogs, while leaving thousands of migrants stranded in Mexico in legal limbo. Second, Biden knows he can't actually implement the policy anew if Mexico doesn't agree to accept migrants whom the US wants to send back. More broadly, the ruling throws yet another wrench into an already testy US-Mexico relationship — with tens of thousands of vulnerable human beings caught in the middle. Biden, who's tied up with the Afghanistan fiasco these days, wants to avoid a tussle with the Mexicans amid record numbers of migrants arriving at the US border so far this year. The Mexicans, for their part, will probably want something in exchange (maybe COVID vaccines) to be helpful.

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