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Former U.S. President and Presidential Republican candidate Donald Trump

REUTERS/Octavio Jones/File Photo

Will the Supreme Court decide the 2024 election?

In Michigan, the state Supreme Court dismissed an appeal to bar former President Donald Trump from the 2024 Republican primary ballot based on the insurrection clause of the 14th Amendment. The decision clashes with the Colorado court’s ruling last week to disqualify Trump from the ballot on the same grounds.

But Michigan’s court simply declined to take up the question of whether Trump is eligible to run in the general election. Punting here allows for future attempts to bar him from the general election ballot if he becomes the Republican nominee.

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Students protesting the US Supreme Court's ruling blocking student loan forgiveness

Allison Bailey via Reuters Connect

Supreme Court rejects Biden’s student loan forgiveness plan

Today, on the final day of its session, the US Supreme Court announced its decision to block President Joe Biden’s student loan forgiveness proposal, which would have canceled more than $400 billion in student loan debt for millions of borrowers.

While disappointing to the 40 million student loan borrowers who would have benefitted from the program, the odds of the conservative majority court ruling in favor of Biden’s proposal were slim. The 6-3 vote was split down ideological lines, with the court’s conservative justices arguing that the law does not authorize the Department of Education to cancel student loan debt.

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People celebrate the US Supreme Court ruling that universities cannot consider race in admissions.

US Supreme Court ends affirmative action in college admissions

The US Supreme Court ruled today to end affirmative action policies in college admissions, prohibiting race from being used as a factor in deciding who gets acceptance letters. The decision, powered by the court’s conservative flank, will force over 40% of US colleges to overhaul their admissions policies.

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People file into the United States Supreme Court before SCOTUS handing down opinions.

Jack Gruber/USA TODAY

It's the final countdown for the US Supreme Court

The US Supreme Court will issue the final decisions of its current term this week, and so far its rulings have been surprisingly moderate for a conservative-majority court.

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Why Clarence Thomas has eroded trust in the US Supreme Court
Why Clarence Thomas has eroded trust in the US Supreme Court | GZERO Media

Why Clarence Thomas has eroded trust in the US Supreme Court

Few Supreme Court Justices have tested the Court's ethical limits like Justice Clarence Thomas, says this week's GZERO World guest, Yale Law School legal expert Emily Bazelon. And that's because, for centuries, Justices have been reluctant to test the boundaries of an ethical system that has few limits. "Federal judges and lower courts are subject to ethical codes," Bazelon explains, "but not the Supreme Court justices themselves."

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One year since Roe v. Wade reversal, biggest surprises in state law
One year since Roe v Wade reversal, biggest surprises in state law | GZERO Media

One year since Roe v. Wade reversal, biggest surprises in state law

Surprises and non-surprises surrounded the Supreme Court's landmark Dobbs ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade last year. It started with the infamous leak to POLITICO about the ruling to come, and then the decision itself came down nearly a year ago today. But according to GZERO World guest Yale Law legal expert Emily Bazelon, one of the biggest surprises happened after the ruling.

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Who polices the Supreme Court?
E550 cutdown | GZERO Media

Who polices the Supreme Court?

Who watches the watchmen? And who oversees the US Supreme Court? As SCOTUS, the highest court in the US, gears up to issue some blockbuster rulings this summer, ethical concerns swirl around its members, and its public support is at an all-time low.

It’s been one year since SCOTUS struck down Roe v. Wade, eliminating the constitutional right to abortion after 50 years of precedent. In the months following the decision, the conservative supermajority quickly moved US law away from the political center. Multiple controversies erupted surrounding Justice Clarence Thomas, and public opinion balked at a blanket refusal to address questions about the justices’ ethical standard.

Has the Supreme Court become overly politicized? Can public faith be restored in a deeply partisan America? And what major rulings are still to come this session? Ian Bremmer talks with Yale Law School legal expert, New York Times Magazine columnist and co-host of the Slate’s Political Gabfest podcast, Emily Bazelon.

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Podcast: (Un)packing the Supreme Court with Yale Law's Emily Bazelon

Transcript

Listen: The Supreme Court, one of the three branches of government that makes up this country's democratic system of checks and balances, doesn't have a military. As a result, when its justices make a ruling, they are counting on a strong sense of public trust to ensure their decisions are carried out. Not all countries on this planet can count on that public trust, and with popular support for the Court plummeting to record lows, some experts fear that the United States may soon be unable to as well.

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