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Supreme Court will rule on abortion rights once again. What’s at stake now?
Supreme Court will rule on abortion rights once again. What’s at stake now? | GZERO World

Supreme Court will rule on abortion rights once again. What’s at stake now?

Abortion is once again on the docket at the US Supreme Court this year. In June, justices will rule on two major reproductive rights cases: one involving the abortion pill, known as mifepristone, and another involving emergency room abortions. SCOTUS expert Emily Bazelon joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to explain the issues at the heart of both cases and why the stakes for abortion rights this term are so high.


“The [abortion pill case] affects women across the country, it’s not state by state,” Bazelon stresses, “It’s the FDA’s authority to allow pills to be shipped everywhere and other rules that have made abortion pills more accessible for women in blue as well as red states.”

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The major Supreme Court decisions to watch for in June
The major Supreme Court decisions to watch for in June | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

The major Supreme Court decisions to watch for in June

In June, the US Supreme Court will begin issuing decisions on cases involving everything from reproductive rights to gun ownership to homeless encampments to former president Donald Trump’s criminal cases. Yale Law School Lecturer and staff writer at the New York Times Magazine Emily Bazelon joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to unpack some of the biggest cases on the docket this year and what’s at stake in some of the major decisions expected to come down next month.

This year’s SCOTUS term comes at a time when approval for the Court is at an all-time low. As of September of 2023, a record 58% of Americans disapproved of how the Court handles its job. That follows multiple ethics scandals involving Associate Justice Clarence Thomas and a string of conservative decisions, including the 2022 Dobbs decision striking down the right to abortion, increasingly out of step with public opinion. With the Court wading into the 2024 election and former President Trump’s immunity claims, it risks being seen by the public as even more partisan and politicized.

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The US Supreme Court, less trusted than ever, votes on major cases in June: Emily Bazelon on what to expect


Listen: It’s a big year for the US Supreme Court. In June, SCOTUS will begin issuing decisions on a number of politically charged cases, including abortion rights, gun control, and whether former president Donald Trump will stand trial for criminal cases, just as the 2024 election season shifts into high gear. Yale Law School lecturer and staff writer at The New York Times Magazine Emily Bazelon joins Ian Bremmer on the GZERO World Podcast to unpack some of the biggest cases on the docket this year, what's at stake, and what expected rulings will mean for the future of our democracy. This year’s term comes as public approval for SCOTUS hit a record low. The Court is facing accusations of politicization following ethics scandals involving Justice Clarence Thomas and a string of decisions from the conservative majority that advanced Republican policy goals, such as striking down the federal right to abortion. The Court was designed to remain above the political fray, but with the stakes so high in a presidential election year, does it risk being seen as just another partisan institution?


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Graphic Truth:  Abortion meds in SCOTUS case are crucial

The US Supreme Court heard arguments on Tuesday on whether access to mifepristone, an oral drug used to terminate a pregnancy, should be restricted. The drug works by blocking progesterone, a hormone that’s necessary for a pregnancy to continue. The case centers on whether changes the FDA made in 2016 and 2021, which broadened access to the drug, should be rolled back.

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Women take part in a protest in support of safe and legal abortion access in Mexico City.

Reuters

Mexico decriminalizes abortion

In a landmark decision, Mexico’s Supreme Court has decriminalized abortion nationwide. It’s a big deal for the predominantly Catholic country, where federal healthcare workers in many places were penalized for performing the procedure.

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Ohio vote reflects abortion’s mobilizing power

Voters in the Buckeye State on Tuesday, with 57% of the vote, struck down Issue 1, a Republican-backed proposal aimed at making it harder to change the state’s constitution. If it had passed, a constitutional amendment on abortion rights planned for this November would’ve required a 60% supermajority to pass.

Proponents advertised it as a safeguard against mob rule and wealthy out-of-state interests, but opponents saw it as a thinly veiled attack on abortion rights. Blatant admissions from Republicans and a flood of money from pro-life groups backing Issue 1 reinforced those concerns.

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India is not a US ally ... or is it?
India is not a US ally ... or is it? | GZERO World

India is not a US ally ... or is it?

If the United States and India were ever to make it Facebook official, their status would be: "It's Complicated." These two global behemoths may seem like close allies, especially judging by the warm welcome President Biden gave Prime Minister Modi during his White House visit in June, but in reality, they are anything but best friends.

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One year since Roe v. Wade reversal, biggest surprises in state law
One year since Roe v Wade reversal, biggest surprises in state law | GZERO Media

One year since Roe v. Wade reversal, biggest surprises in state law

Surprises and non-surprises surrounded the Supreme Court's landmark Dobbs ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade last year. It started with the infamous leak to POLITICO about the ruling to come, and then the decision itself came down nearly a year ago today. But according to GZERO World guest Yale Law legal expert Emily Bazelon, one of the biggest surprises happened after the ruling.

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