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The End of Roe | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

US Supreme Court fights: why ending Roe is only the beginning

The US is now a much more divided country than it was almost 50 years ago, when the Supreme Court granted the constitutional right to abortion — recently overturned by the court.

Interestingly, most of the rest of the world is moving in the opposite direction, including in majority-Catholic countries. But striking down Roe v. Wade will surely have a bigger impact on US politics.

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer speaks to New York Times columnist Emily Bazelon, who knows a thing or two about this ultra-divisive issue because she's also a senior research fellow at Yale Law School.

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Podcast: An active US Supreme Court overturns "settled law" on abortion. What's next?

Listen: Americans now live in a much more divided country — as has been on full display after the US Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and removed the constitutional right to an abortion, while the rest of the world - including largely Catholic countries in Latin America and Europe - is moving in the opposite direction. But the SCOTUS ruling is already making waves around the world.

On the GZERO World podcast, Ian Bremmer speaks to New York Times columnist and senior research fellow at Yale Law School, Emily Bazelon, who knows a thing or two about abortion law.

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Roe v. Wade Overturned: Abortion Restricted in Half of US States | GZERO World

Roe v. Wade overturned: Abortion restricted in half of US states

Now that the US Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, roughly half the states have legislation on the books restricting abortion.

And 13 of them had "trigger laws" to ban abortion once the 1973 ruling was struck down. Residents of those states seeking abortions must now travel across state lines to get an abortion — and Missouri wants to sue those who do.

What's more, it'll be a long drive: an average of 125 miles, compared to just 25 when Roe was still the law of the land, Ian Bremmer explains on GZERO World.

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Paige Fusco

The Graphic Truth: America's increased use of abortion pills

In little over 20 years, abortion pills have gone from being illegal to the most popular way for Americans to get abortions. But now that Roe v. Wade has been overturned, it's unclear whether or how US states that ban abortion will block access to medication abortions. We take a look at how abortion pill usage has progressed in recent decades.

Abortion-rights activists protest outside the US Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v Wade.

REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein

What We’re Watching: The future of abortion in America, Madrid hosts NATO summit

US states fight over post-Roe abortion rights

In case you've been living under a rock, on Friday the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade, the landmark ruling that protected abortion rights in America for almost 50 years. The decision, as expected, caused an outcry among abortion-rights activists and sparked jubilation for those in the anti-abortion camp. Now, the center of attention shifts to individual US states since 13 Republican-led ones had so-called "trigger laws" to prohibit or severely restrict abortion in case Roe was overturned. Although the verdict is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states, when and how those laws will go into effect — and potential legal challenges to them — make the timeline hard to predict. Conversely, several states governed by Democrats are taking steps to codify Roe into law, ushering in an uncertain period of legal fights between states to determine whether those who perform and assist abortions can be prosecuted out-of-state, and over access to anti-abortion pills. Politically, the ruling is a double-edged sword for the GOP, which hopes it'll fire up social conservatives, but also fears the Dems could use the verdict to energize their own base and make inroads with suburban women in swing states ahead of the November midterms. Moreover, the ruling has already become a major battleground of the larger culture wars for corporate America.

Check out more of our coverage on the historic SCOTUS reversal:

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Politicized SCOTUS Losing Legitimacy After Roe v. Wade Reversal | Quick Take | GZERO Media

Politicized SCOTUS losing legitimacy after Roe v. Wade reversal

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Hi, everybody. Ian Bremmer here. A Quick Take for you on the back of this landmark ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States to overturn Roe v. Wade. For 50 years now, abortion until the viability of the fetus, around 23 weeks of pregnancy, has been legal in the entirety of the United States. That ends today.

Important to look at how Americans view abortion. It's actually a very mixed picture, depending on the question that you ask. Almost all Americans, about 90%, believe that abortion should be legal in some circumstances and not in others. So, I mean, frankly broadly the compromise that's been the law of the land for the last 50 years hasn't been completely happy for anyone, but has been generally a position that most of the population could get behind. A strong majority of Democrats and Republicans do agree with that formulation, that abortion should be legal in some circumstances and illegal in other circumstances.

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Victory for US Conservatives: Roe Overturned | US Politics : 60 | GZERO Media

Victory for US conservatives: Roe v. Wade overturned by SCOTUS

Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, shares his perspective on US politics:

What will be the immediate impact of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?

This week's decision is the culmination of 40 years of work by the conservative legal movement to create the alignment of justices willing to make this choice, which ironically came together during the presidency of Donald Trump, who, for most of his career, was not a conservative Republican. Abortion could become a relevant issue in the midterm elections, but surveys are showing that most voters are much more activated by the economy at the moment than abortion. That could change however as there's going to be a movement in states to either deny or preserve access to abortion, which could put the issue on the ballot in places like Pennsylvania, Michigan, Arizona and Georgia.

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The Graphic Truth: Abortion and race in America

Women across America will be impacted if the US Supreme Court repeals the landmark Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion. But some will struggle more than others. Women and girls of means living in the South and Midwest – where abortion is likely to be outlawed – will likely be able to travel to deep-blue states where the procedure will remain legal. That won’t be an option for women from lower socio-economic groups who can’t afford to travel across the country for the procedure. Women’s rights groups say that women of color will be most disadvantaged by the change. We take a look at the percent of annual abortions, by race, in the 13 states with trigger laws that would outlaw abortion if Roe v. Wade is overturned.

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