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Health Data Privacy Is the Next Post-Roe Fight | GZERO World

Health data privacy is the next post-Roe fight

Now that the US Supreme Court has ruled that states can do their own thing on abortion rights, women are worried about who can check their online personal health data.

Apps have been a game-changer for American women tracking their menstrual cycles, ovulation, or pregnancy status. But that information could be used against them where abortion is illegal.

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| GZERO Media

"We need to invest in public health," says former CDC director, lessons that "we better learn"

If we've learned anything from COVID, former CDC chief Tom Frieden says it's that we need to invest a lot more in public health.

"We need a renaissance in our public health system. We need a robust primary care system. And we need resilient populations," he tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Without good primary care, we can't get detect outbreaks, diagnose, treat, or vaccinate properly. Resilient populations means those that can withstand the shock of a pandemic because, for instance, chronic diseases are under control.

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S2 Episode 3: How the pandemic could change healthcare forever

Listen: For all the flaws of many healthcare systems around the world, we've seen unprecedented coordination among researchers, healthcare providers, manufacturers, and governments which led to the rapid development of effective COVID-19 vaccines. In this episode, we'll look at the lessons learned during the pandemic - from telemedicine to vaccine breakthroughs - and how they can continue to improve the healthcare industry in the coming years.

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Ian Bremmer Explains: CRISPR and the Gene-Editing Revolution | GZERO World

CRISPR and the gene-editing revolution

CRISPR stands for Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats. You don't have to remember that, but you should know that this new gene editing technique can literally change life as we know it. Through CRISPR, scientists are now able to precisely edit DNA sequences in living things. They hope to be able to cure genetic diseases like sickle cell anemia and hereditary blindness. CRISPR may even be used to treat cancer and HIV. There's a darker side to CRISPR. What about engineering soldiers who can fight without fear or pain? Many argue that using CRISPR technology—for good or bad—amounts to playing God and that its use should be halted altogether. Others, like the World Health Organization, see enormous potential for the science but want to put limits on its application to prevent humanity from bringing out our own worst traits. Ian Bremmer explains what we know and don't know about the brave new world of gene editing.

Watch the episode: CRISPR gene editing and the human race

What Is CRISPR? Jennifer Doudna Explains | GZERO World

What is CRISPR? Gene editing pioneer Jennifer Doudna explains

What is CRISPR? Jennifer Doudna explains You may have heard of CRISPR, but don't know exactly what it is, or how it works. Ian Bremmer asked Jennifer Doudna, who won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her work on this gene-editing technology. CRISPR, she says, basically allows scientists to not only study but also make precise, targeted changes to DNA, the "code of life." Find out more in her interview on GZERO World.

Watch the episode: https://www.gzeromedia.com/crispr-gene-editing-and-the-human-race

CRISPR Gene Editing and the Human Race | Scientist Jennifer Doudna | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

CRISPR gene editing and the human race

Berkeley scientist Jennifer Doudna won the 2020 Nobel Prize for her work on the revolutionary gene-editing technology known as CRISPR. It has the potential to cure genetic diseases like sickle cell anemia and hereditary blindness and may even be used to treat cancer and HIV. But when it comes to editing humanity, where do we draw the line? How do we avoid falling into the same kind of dystopian nightmare outlined in Blade Runner? Doudna discussed the risks and benefits of CRISPR in an interview with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World. Also in this episode: a look at cloning our pets (speaking of going too far…).

“Essential Workers” and the Inequality of Work | GZERO World

“Essential workers” and the inequality of work

Organizational psychologist Adam Grant discusses the "essential workers" who kept the world going throughout the pandemic and didn't get to work from home. According to Grant, the US should be rethinking its policy on essential work. "Where was hazard pay for all the teachers? For all the medical professionals? For all the warehouse workers who put their lives at risk to keep the world running, and to try to keep the economy alive as well?" asked Grant, in an interview with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Watch the episode: Adam Grant reimagines work after COVID

Affordable Care Act Upheld by Supreme Court & Republicans Move On | US Politics :60 | GZERO Media

Affordable Care Act upheld by Supreme Court, and Republicans move on

Jon Lieber, Managing Director of the United States for the Eurasia Group, shares updates on recent policy developments:

With the Supreme Court's recent decision, is the Affordable Care Act here to stay?

Yes, this was the Court's third ruling on the Affordable Care Act upholding its constitutionality. This challenge was brought by Republican attorneys general who argued that the repeal of the individual mandate tax undermined the court's previous justification for allowing the law to stand. They were unsuccessful, yet again. And the political salience of the Affordable Care Act has really diminished in the last several years, with Republicans moving on to fight other issues and the Court signaling very strongly they don't want to get involved in overturning this piece of legislation. The Affordable Care Act will be here at least until Congress wants to legislate on it again.

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