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Biden team extends eviction moratorium despite SCOTUS ruling

Jon Lieber, Managing Director of the United States for Eurasia Group, shares updates on recent COVID-19 policy developments:

The Biden administration extended an eviction moratorium even after the Supreme Court said they couldn't, what's next?

Well, the CDC imposed a nationwide eviction moratorium in light of increased risk from evicted people because of the coronavirus pandemic. The Supreme Court in June ruled that they (CDC) overextended their authority in doing so and mandated that the moratorium expire on schedule in July. A group of progressive activists weren't happy about this and raised a huge stink in Congress, but Congress recessed for their August vacation before they could solve the problem, putting big pressure on President Biden to extend the moratorium even though he said he didn't think that it would pass constitutional muster. The CDC did it anyway, extending the moratorium until October 3rd, which is a time that's short enough to probably avoid it being overturned by lawsuits, but long enough that Congress has time to figure out how to either extend it on a bipartisan basis or put more money into a rental assistance fund that few people have taken advantage of so far. This whole incident shows the power of progressive activists in the Biden administration who were able to elevate the profile of this issue and potentially prevent millions of people from losing their homes this summer.

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What is the real origin of the COVID-19 virus?

A controversial new World Health Organization report on the origins of the coronavirus that suggests it likely originated from a bat but transferred to humans via an intermediary animal. Could the virus have emerged from a Chinese lab, as former CDC Director Robert Redfield recently suggested? That's the least likely scenario, says the WHO's chief scientist, Dr. Soumya Swaminathan. "The betacoronaviruses are very, very common in bats and there's a lot of genetic similarity between the SARS-CoV2 and many of the viruses in the...bat species," Dr. Swaminathan told Ian Bremmer in an interview on GZERO World, airing on US public television stations starting April 9. Check local listings.

Watch the episode: Vaccine nationalism could prolong the pandemic

Podcast: Dr. Fauci's Pandemic Prognosis

Listen: The country's top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, joins Ian Bremmer to talk vaccines, school re-openings, and when—and how—the pandemic could finally come end. He was last on GZERO World just weeks before the pandemic hit in the fall of 2019 and he described at the time what kept him up at night: a "pandemic-like respiratory illness." This time, he talks about how closely that nightmare scenario foreshadowed the COVID-19 pandemic. He also offers some guidance about what public health measures vaccinated Americans should continue to take in the coming months (hint: masks stay on).

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.

Dr. Fauci’s cautious take on post-vaccine life

Dr. Tony Fauci has faced renewed heat lately from critics across the political spectrum, including The View's Meghan McCain, who feel the White House has not provided clear enough guidance to Americans about how to navigate the pandemic. And as millions receive their second jab of COVID-19 vaccines, demands for clear guidelines about what vaccinated Americans can or cannot do have grown louder. On GZERO World, Dr. Fauci offers more context, but stops short from providing definitive answers, about post-vaccine life. "You know, things will change gradually because we want to accumulate data....Just because you're vaccinated, restaurants are not going to open. Ball games are not going to be played necessarily. Theaters are not going to be open."

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Pressures on CDC for November COVID vaccine release

Jon Lieber, who leads Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, shares his perspective on US politics.

How does the CDC look in advising states to prepare for an early November COVID vaccine release?

Well, there's two things going on here. The first is the pressure that the scientists and doctors working in the private sector and the federal government feel to get a vaccine out so we can all return to our normal lives. The second thing that's going on here is the political pressure coming from the White House to get a vaccine out the door so that President Trump can argue that he's returned things to normal. It's unclear which one of those pressures is pushing the CDC to action right now. It's possible that a vaccine is ready for an emergency use authorization by early November. But if the data doesn't support that it's safe, there's going to be a lot of blowback from the public health community, which could in turn undermine confidence in the public to actually take the vaccine when it comes out it is safe. So this is a big issue to keep your eye on.

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Pandemic-Proofing the World (How to Stop the COVID-19 Nightmare from Happening Again)

"We now have for the first time, pre-COVID, a very good sense of where the gaps are" says former CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden on pandemic preparedness. But in order to prevent another pandemic from bringing the world to its knees, he argues, the United States must play a more proactive role on the global stage. First step: work much more closely with the CDC (and don't, for starters, pull funding during a pandemic).

CDC Has Maintained High US Trust; Will This Change?

Ian Bremmer looks at how American public trust in government has fallen off a cliff in a relatively short period of time. However, public trust in one of the most critical institutions of the moment, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, remains high.

Flying blind: The US government’s pandemic response with Dr. Tom Frieden

Former CDC director – and current CEO of the public health initiative Resolve to Save Lives – Dr. Tom Frieden joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to talk about how to get the Covid-19 pandemic under control in the United States (hint: we need more data). As with politics, Dr. Frieden argues, all epidemics are local. And the outbreaks crippling much of the South and Southwest need local responses. But the main failing lies at the federal level. Things won't improve (and schools won't effectively reopen) Dr. Frieden warns, until Washington alters course. That is, of course, until an effective vaccine becomes readily accessible to all Americans. Though even that will likely not be the silver bullet we all want it to be.

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