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Biden likely to push Putin on cybersecurity in Geneva meeting

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

When President Biden and President Putin meet, will cybersecurity will be a key issue that they discuss?

Now, I'm sure that there will be many thorny issues on the table. But after American fingers pointed to Russia and hold it responsible for the SolarWinds hack, it's likely. Criminals in Russia were also not hindered when they held the Colonial Pipeline Company ransom through a ransomware attack. And really, when journalists and opposition leaders cannot speak a single critical word without being caught, how come cybercriminals can act with impunity in Russia? So the need for prevention and accountability really is significant. And I hope the President Biden can push and persuade Putin to change the confrontational and aggressive course that he is on.

Hackers shut down US pipeline

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Hi, everybody. Ian Bremmer here. Happy Monday to you. A Quick Take. I wanted to talk about this unprecedented hack that has shut down a major pipeline in the United States. The Colonial Pipeline carries well over 2 million barrels a day. It's about half of the East Coast supply of gas and jet fuel. In other words, really not something you want to have suspended. And when I think about the impact of cyberattacks in the world, I mean, we've been warning that this is going to be a bigger challenge going forward, we're now really starting to see the implications of it.

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Watch today's live program: Securing Cyberspace

Cyber is a tool, and sometimes a weapon. Whether espionage for commercial gain or indiscriminate attacks on critical infrastructure, actions taken in cyber space affect you directly, potentially upending even the most mundane realities of everyday life.

Watch GZERO Media and Microsoft's live conversation on cyber challenges facing governments, companies, and citizens in a Munich Security Conference "Road to Munich" event recorded today, May 18.

Event link: gzeromedia.com/globalstage

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Impact of Microsoft hack deepens; why cyber attacks target healthcare

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford University's Cyber Policy Center and former European Parliamentarian, shares insights on the latest news about big tech, privacy protection and emerging trends in cyberspace.

What is the deal with the recently revealed Microsoft hack?

Well, it's the second hack of historic proportions after SolarWinds. At first, it was considered a targeted Chinese effort to go after individuals critical to the state. But last week we saw escalations with victims now estimated in the tens, if not hundreds of thousands. And the US government CISA called on all organizations in all sectors to follow guidance and to patch the vulnerabilities that are being exploited, even if that does not stop already gained access by hackers.

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SolarWinds hack a wake-up call to the tech sector

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford University's Cyber Policy Center and former European Parliamentarian, discusses recent developments on big tech, privacy protection and emerging trends in cyberspace.

What immediate impact has the SolarWinds hack had on private companies?

Now, I hope it's meant a shock into action. The SolarWinds hack should be a wake-up call to all companies selling software, because any kind of negligence to ensure the highest security standards will come back as a boomerang to individual companies, but also to the tech sector collectively. Digitalization has come to mean privatization, and connectivity means vulnerability. Add these up and you can see the trust has to be earned every day.

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Why the US was unprepared for the 2020 cyber breach

They call it Einstein. It's the multibillion-dollar digital defense system the US has used to catch outside hackers and attackers since 2003. But it was no match for what's looking like one of the biggest cyber breaches in US history. Ian Bremmer breaks it down.

Watch the GZERO World episode: Cyber attack: an act of espionage or war?

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Podcast: Russia's Cyber Attack: An Act of Espionage or War? Jeh Johnson's Perspective

Listen: Former US Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson spent years trying to protect the United States against the kind of massive cyber attack that Russia carried out against American businesses and government agencies in the last year. But at what point should we view such a breach as more than a remarkable feat of espionage? When does it constitute an act of war? Johnson joins Ian Bremmer to discuss.

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.

Does Jeh Johnson consider Russia’s cyber attack against the US to be an act of war?

"When I was at Homeland Security, I used to tell people to prepare and plan for the next attack, not the last attack. I used to try to encourage my people to think aggressively, to try to stay one step ahead of the enemy." Former US Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson spent years trying to protect the United States against the kind of massive cyber attack that Russia carried out against American businesses and government agencies in the last year. But at what point should we view such a breach as more than a remarkable feat of espionage? When does it constitute an act of war?

Johnson's conversation with Ian Bremmer was part of the latest episode of GZERO World, which begins airing nationally in the US on public television Friday, January 8th. Check local listings.

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