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Tech Talent Wars & the Role of Ethics in Big Tech Success (Long-Term) | Frances Haugen | GZERO World

Tech talent wars & the role of ethics in Big Tech success (long-term)

Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen still has hope that the corporate culture inside tech companies can change for the better.
"Huge things that seemed impossible [...] all came to be," she says, comparing the idea to historical tectonic shifts like the end of the Cold War or apartheid in South Africa.

Speaking to Ian Bremmer on GZERO World, Haugen says that she doesn't want to tear down social media companies. In fact, she wants them to be successful in the long run "because culture change will come along with that."

Google recently had to ditch a lucrative Pentagon contract in order to retain the best talent.

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The Path to Holding Social Media Companies Accountable | GZERO World

The path to holding social media companies accountable

Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen thinks governments need to rethink how they regulate social media companies to hold them accountable for the consequences of their actions.

Instead of laws banning specific stuff, which lawyers are very good at skirting, governments should develop legislation that opens conversations about potential problems.

"That's an ongoing, flexible approach to trying to direct them back towards the common good," she tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

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Whistleblowers & How to Activate A New Era of Digital Accountability | Full Interview | GZERO World

Whistleblowers & how to activate a new era of digital accountability

Frances Haugen famously blew the whistle against her then-employer, Facebook. She says we must recognize that the gap between fast-changing tech and slow-moving governments will continue to widen, and the best way to narrow it, is to encourage people to speak out against questionable practices. These whistleblowers need better laws to protect them, she tells Ian Bremmer in a GZERO World interview.

Despite all of this, Haugen still has hope that the corporate culture inside tech companies can change for the better. The role of social media companies in politics is still growing, and now the failures of social media companies can have life-or-death consequences.

Haugen suggests that governments need to rethink how they regulate social media companies, and hold them more accountable for the consequences of their actions.

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How GDPR Protects Your Social Media Data (Even If You Accept All Cookies) | GZERO World

How GDPR protects your social media data (even if you accept all cookies)

Why are apps and websites increasingly asking us if we're willing to share our cookies?

The EU's General Data Protection Regulation may be somewhat annoying to the average consumer, but for social media companies it was a wakeup call about the huge amount of private data they'd accumulated, says Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen.

And that's a slippery slope for the likes of Facebook or Google.

"One of the things that you get as part of GDPR is the right to request any data that a company has on you," Haugen tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

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Was Elon Musk Right About Twitter’s Bots? | GZERO World

Was Elon Musk right about Twitter's bots?

The world's richest man is trying to get out of buying Twitter because the social media platform has a lot more fake accounts than he thought.

But does he have a point? Certainly, says Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen, who even recalls one social network with bots accounting for half of its users.

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Why Social Media Is Broken & How to Fix It | Frances Haugen | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Why social media is broken & how to fix it

Social media companies play an outsize role in global politics — from the US to Myanmar. And when they fail, their actions can cost lives.

That's why Frances Haugen blew the whistle against her then-employer, Facebook, when she felt the company hadn't done enough to stop an outrage-driven algorithm from spreading misinformation, hate, and even offline violence.

On GZERO World, Haugen tells Ian Bremmer why governments need to rethink how they regulate social media. A good example is the EU, whose new law mandating data transparency could have global ripple effects.

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Podcast: How to get social media companies to protect users (instead of hurting them)

Listen: Frances Haugen blew the whistle against Facebook because she believed her employer wasn't doing enough to stop its outrage-driven algorithm from spreading online misinformation and hate, which led to offline violence. Haugen speaks with Ian Bremmer on the GZERO World podcast about the major role that social media companies play in politics in the US and around the world, and the life-or-death consequences that can come from their actions. She believes governments need to rethink how they regulate social media, as the EU is trying to do with a new law mandating data transparency.

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Why EU Social Media Regulation Matters To You | GZERO World

What happens in Europe, doesn’t stay in Europe — why EU social media regulation matters to you

The EU just approved the Digital Services Act, which for the first time will mandate social media companies come clean about what they do with our data.

Okay, but perhaps you don't live there. Why should you care?

First, transparency matters, says Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen.

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