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Tech Talent Wars & the Role of Ethics in Big Tech Success (Long-Term) | Frances Haugen | GZERO World

Tech talent wars & the role of ethics in Big Tech success (long-term)

Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen still has hope that the corporate culture inside tech companies can change for the better.
"Huge things that seemed impossible [...] all came to be," she says, comparing the idea to historical tectonic shifts like the end of the Cold War or apartheid in South Africa.

Speaking to Ian Bremmer on GZERO World, Haugen says that she doesn't want to tear down social media companies. In fact, she wants them to be successful in the long run "because culture change will come along with that."

Google recently had to ditch a lucrative Pentagon contract in order to retain the best talent.

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Whistleblowers & How to Activate A New Era of Digital Accountability | Full Interview | GZERO World

Whistleblowers & how to activate a new era of digital accountability

Frances Haugen famously blew the whistle against her then-employer, Facebook. She says we must recognize that the gap between fast-changing tech and slow-moving governments will continue to widen, and the best way to narrow it, is to encourage people to speak out against questionable practices. These whistleblowers need better laws to protect them, she tells Ian Bremmer in a GZERO World interview.

Despite all of this, Haugen still has hope that the corporate culture inside tech companies can change for the better. The role of social media companies in politics is still growing, and now the failures of social media companies can have life-or-death consequences.

Haugen suggests that governments need to rethink how they regulate social media companies, and hold them more accountable for the consequences of their actions.

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Why Social Media Is Broken & How to Fix It | Frances Haugen | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Why social media is broken & how to fix it

Social media companies play an outsize role in global politics — from the US to Myanmar. And when they fail, their actions can cost lives.

That's why Frances Haugen blew the whistle against her then-employer, Facebook, when she felt the company hadn't done enough to stop an outrage-driven algorithm from spreading misinformation, hate, and even offline violence.

On GZERO World, Haugen tells Ian Bremmer why governments need to rethink how they regulate social media. A good example is the EU, whose new law mandating data transparency could have global ripple effects.

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Podcast: We have to control AI before it controls us, warns former Google CEO Eric Schmidt

Listen: Tech companies set the rules for the digital world through algorithms powered by artificial intelligence. But does Big Tech really understand AI? Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt tells Ian Bremmer that we need to control AI before it controls us.

What's troubling about AI, he says, is that it’s still very new, and AI is learning by doing. Schmidt, co-author of “The Age of AI: And Our Human Future,” worries that AI exacerbates problems like anxiety, driving a human addiction cycle that leads to depression.

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.

Podcast: Brave new big tech world: Nicholas Thompson's perspective

Listen: Can Big Government still rein in Big Tech or has it already lost control? Never before have just a few companies exerted such an outsized influence on humanity. Today's digital space, where we live so much of our daily lives, has increasingly become an area that national governments are unable to control. It may be time to start thinking of these corporations as nation-states in their own rights. Ian Bremmer speaks with Nicholas Thompson, CEO of the Atlantic and former WIRED editor-in-chief, about how to police the digital world.

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.

Ian Bremmer: Big Tech’s Big Challenge to the Global Order | Quick Take | GZERO Media

Big Tech's big challenge to the global order

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Read Ian Bremmer's wide-ranging essay in Foreign Affairs that puts in perspective both the challenge, and the opportunity, that comes from the unprecedented power of Big Tech.

Hi, everybody. Ian Bremmer here on the road, something we haven't done very much recently, but will increasingly as we try to move through COVID. And I want to talk to you about a new article that I just put out in Foreign Affairs that I'm calling "The Technopolar Moment." Not unipolar, not bipolar, not multipolar, technopolar. What the hell does technopolar mean?

It means that increasingly big technology companies are themselves geopolitical actors. So to understand the future of the world, you can't just look at the United States, Europe and China. You need to look at the big tech companies, too.

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Humans Should Learn From, not Get Hooked by Algorithms — AI Scientist | GZERO World

AI understands you. It won't replace you.

Artificial intelligence has already surpassed that of humans in many fields. So, how can we leverage that power to humans' advantage? AI scientist Kai-fu Lee says social media companies should use AI so we can learn more about the algorithms that determine what shows up in our newsfeeds — and, more importantly, why, so it'll help us in our daily lives instead of just keeping our eyeballs there. Watch his interview with Ian Bremmer on the latest episode of GZERO World.

Watch this episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer: Is a robot coming for your job? Kai-fu Lee explains AI

Ian Explains: The 90's Law Still Governing The Internet | Section 230 | GZERO World

Section 230: The 90's law still governing the internet

The technology of the 1990s looked nothing like today's connected world—and the internet hosted just a fraction of the billions of people who now use it every day. Yet, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, passed in 1996, is the law that governs rights and responsibilities of social media companies…that weren't even around when it was written. Ian Bremmer explains on GZERO World.

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