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Russian hackers found targeting US election; robots that write?

Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, helps us make sense of today's stories in technology:

What are the Russians doing to the US election?

Well, they are trying to hack it. They're trying to hack into the accounts of individuals working on campaigns. They're trying to hack into accounts of nonprofit organizations. They're trying to mess it all up again. They're probably trying to help their favorite candidate, too. How did we find out about it? Well, Microsoft, thank you Microsoft, is running an election security operation and they noticed this. Now, have they found everything that the Russian group Fancy Bear is doing? I highly doubt it. We'll probably learn a lot more after the election, unfortunately.

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Barr pressures DOJ to bring antitrust suit against Google

Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, discusses technology industry news today:

What's the deal with Google and antitrust?

Well, we've long known that the Department of Justice is likely bringing an antitrust suit against Google. What we've just learned this week is that William Barr, the attorney general, is pressuring them to bring it really quickly, and the career lawyers don't like that idea. Why is he doing that? Maybe because he thinks they're going slowly, maybe because he wants a political victory for Trump before the election.

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Uber, Lyft, Epic & Apple: what's at stake in Big Tech lawsuits

Watch as Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, explains what's at stake in Big Tech lawsuits in 2020:

What's going on between Uber & Lyft and the state of California?

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Digital campaigning in 2020 will rely on personal connections

Nicholas Thompson, Editor-in-Chief of WIRED, provides his perspective on technology news:

How do you run a successful digital campaign in 2020?

Well, we know that all campaigning during 2020, because of the pandemic, will be digital. What do you need to do? My guess is that the most successful campaigns will be ones that really learn how to leverage personal connections, to make it easy for you to pass a message to someone in your address book. Because I think mass communication, mass blasts, registration forms to "get out the vote" on big web sites were saturated. It's going to be human to human contact that changes people's votes or gets people to the polls who wouldn't get there otherwise.

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