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Will the US Be Able to Withstand Cyber Attacks on Critical Infrastructure? | GZERO World

Will the US be able to withstand cyber attacks on critical infrastructure?

The US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency was set up in 2018 to help protect America's critical infrastructure.

It might sound like a technical term, but CISA chief Jen Easterly explains that critical infrastructure is how we get water, power, gas — even food at the grocery store. And 80% of it is operated by the private sector.

So, how does the agency help businesses defend themselves from hackers?

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Russia’s War in Ukraine Started a Day Earlier in Cyberspace | Microsoft's Brad Smith | Global Stage

Brad Smith: Russia's war in Ukraine started on Feb 23 in cyberspace

Weeks before Russia invaded Ukraine, Microsoft was already helping the Ukrainians defend their cyberspace against Russian hackers, for instance by moving the government's physical servers into the cloud to avoid destruction by Russian missiles.

In the virtual world, like on the battlefield, "you've gotta disperse your defensive assets so they're not vulnerable to a single attack," Microsoft President Brad Smith says in a Global Stage livestream discussion at the World Economic Forum in Davos, "Crisis in a digital world," hosted by GZERO in partnership with Microsoft.

Then came defending Ukraine against Russian cyberattacks.

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Russia Cyberattack on the West: Feared, Predicted, Not Manifested Yet | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

Watching Russia: cyber threats & disinformation

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses the Ukraine conflict from the cybersecurity perspective:

Unfortunately, the war that Russia started against Ukraine is still ongoing in all its devastation. And so today we focus again on some of the tech related aspects of that completely unjust and unnecessary conflict.

How likely will Russia launch a sweeping cyberattack on the West?

Well, I don't have a crystal ball, but going by with what we've seen in the past with ransomware attacks, hacks, cyberattacks on Ukraine's power grid already years ago, as well as attempts to manipulate the US presidential elections, there are certainly is no lack of will or ability on the Russian side and that makes the absence of new meddling or direct attacks with devastating impact on Western targets, actually quite remarkable. These were feared and predicted, but they have not quite manifested yet.

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Cyberwar in Ukraine: Part of Putin's Escalation & Geopolitical Agenda | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

Cyber warfare & disinformation play key role in Russia Ukraine conflict

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses the Ukraine conflict from the cybersecurity perspective:

These are dark and bitter times. We've just seen Russia starting a completely unjustifiable war with disproportionate force against Ukraine and these acts of aggression that we see, threats on the foundations of a rules based order and of our own freedoms in democracies worldwide. Yes, to all this aggression, there is also a cyber dimension.

Cyber warfare is clearly a major part of the Russia Ukraine conflict, but cyber weapons are notoriously hard to control.

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Identifying cyber threats, urgent priority for tech companies – Microsoft’s Brad Smith | GZERO Media

"We're identifying new cyber threats and attacks every day" – Microsoft’s Brad Smith

Cyber threats are the new frontier of war. That's why companies like Microsoft are investing heavily in the capability to identify new threats and attempted attacks. “We work every day to make sure that we’re identifying new threats and attacks, regardless of where they’re from,” said Microsoft President Brad Smith at the Munich Security Conference. This includes monitoring infiltrations and alerting companies, countries and sometimes even the public, as needed, in a timely fashion, he explained.

Smith spoke with moderator David Sanger in GZERO Media's Global Stage livestream discussion at the Munich Security Conference.

As Crises Converge: Russia/Ukraine, Cyber, Disinformation | MSC 2022 | Global Stage | GZERO Media

How Russian cyberwarfare could impact Ukraine & NATO response

World leaders were on hand Friday for the start of the Munich Security Conference amid increasing tensions over Ukraine. In a Global Stage livestream conversation in Munich, moderator David Sanger of The New York Times discussed the Russian threat and the need to secure cyberspace with the former president of Estonia, Kersti Kaljulaid, NATO Deputy Secretary General Mircea Geoană, Benedikt Franke, chief executive officer of the Munich Security Conference, Anne-Marie Slaughter, CEO of New America, Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media, and Brad Smith, president and vice chair of Microsoft.

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“Massive Cyber Attack” can trigger Article 5, says Deputy Secretary General of NATO | GZERO World

Russian cyber attack could trigger NATO’s Article 5, warns NATO Deputy Secretary General

Mircea Geoană, Deputy Secretary General of NATO, says that when the alliance decided that cyber should be considered an “operational domain,” the bloc also made the call that a “massive cyber attack” on one member state could trigger Article 5 of NATO’s Washington Treaty. This strikes at the heart of the alliance’s defense clause, which states that an attack on one country is considered an attack on all allies.

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Ukraine Under Fire in The Digital Domain | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

Constant Russian attacks on Ukraine in cyberspace

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

What is cyber's role in the Russia-Ukraine crisis?

Well first of all, the world is looking with great concern at the massive buildup of Russian troops and wonders when or how an invasion into Ukrainian territory could be started from that position. But in the digital domain, Ukraine is already under constant fire. When we go back to 2017, the NotPetya attack was aiming at Ukrainian targets and infecting banks, government agencies, as well as media and took down part of the electricity grid.

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