{{ subpage.title }}

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz and Volodymyr Selenskyj, President of Ukraine, give a press conference

Kay Nietfeld/DPA

What We're Watching: Scholz in Moscow, Trudeau invokes Emergencies Act, a crucial Russian vote

Is there a dog for Olaf Scholz in Moscow? The German chancellor will sit down with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow on Tuesday as fears of a Russian invasion of Ukraine continue to mount. On Monday, Scholz met with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky in Kyiv, and they both downplayed the possibility of Ukraine joining NATO. Such expansion of the alliance is a red line for Putin, who has massed more than 100,000 troops along Ukraine’s border and demanded assurances from Washington that NATO will stop expanding eastward. Scholz has said Berlin will back strong sanctions against Moscow in the event of an invasion, but Germany is also heavily dependent on Russian gas, a vulnerability that Putin will doubtless look to exploit. We’re watching to see how Putin handles the new German leader. At his first head of state meeting with Scholz’s predecessor, Angela Merkel, Putin famously brought his black lab Konni despite knowing the German Chancellor was afraid of dogs. What awaits Scholz?

Read Now Show less

Testing Trudeau's star power

On Monday, Canada's liberal hunk of a PM heads into early elections that no one seems to have wanted... except for him.

When Justin Trudeau announced the move back on August 15, many people questioned the wisdom of holding a national election amid the economic and public health upheavals of the pandemic. "Read the room, Justin," was a common quip, with many saying the early vote was irresponsible from a public health perspective.

Read Now Show less
Reuters

Why are Canadians heading to the polls again next month?

In a bid to capitalize on sustained high public support, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has called a snap election for 20 September, less than two years since the last national vote. Initial polling suggests that Trudeau's Liberal Party has a good chance of recapturing the majority in parliament it lost in 2019, though much will depend on how the campaign evolves.

Still, one thing is clear: This is Trudeau's election to lose. If he is successful in scooping up enough new seats in parliament, that will give the Liberals four more years to execute an agenda that goes big on recovery spending, climate change, and social and health programs. It could prove a risky gamble, however, if he fails. Mikaela McQuade, director at Eurasia Group, explains what to expect.

Read Now Show less

A view shows houses destroyed following a 7.2 magnitude earthquake in Les Cayes, Haiti August 14, 2021.

REUTERS/Ralph Tedy Erol

What We’re Watching: Haiti trembles, Canada's snap election, Malaysia’s political mess

Haiti quake aftermath: If you thought things couldn't possibly get worse for Haiti, they just did. The chronically unstable country, still reeling from the July 7 assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, was literally shaken on Saturday by a magnitude 7.2 earthquake that has killed upwards of 1,400 people and destroyed at least 14,000 homes. What's more, Haitians are now also bracing for a tropical depression that will likely cause floods and landslides in quake-hit areas. Many foreign governments and aid groups have already sent some aid, though many are fearful of a repeat of the situation 11 years ago, when another powerful earthquake devastated the capital, but the assistance was poorly coordinated and failed to reach Haitians that needed it most, and a subsequent cholera outbreak was blamed on UN peacekeepers. When the humanitarian aid does trickle in, the gangs that control large swaths of Haiti say they'll let it through. It's a devastating blow to a country where around two-thirds of people live in poverty.

Read Now Show less

Women in power — Canada's Chrystia Freeland

Heads of state and government typically dominate the spotlight, but it's the office holders that work for and around them who are responsible for some of the biggest policy decisions that forge their country's place in the world. In 2021, still, women leaders are even more likely to go under the radar than their male counterparts.

This International Women's History Month, we shine a light on a few women around the world who are pulling the levers of power.

Chrystia Freeland — dubbed by POLITICO as "Canada's Minister of Everything" — serves as deputy prime minister, finance minister, and was recently foreign minister and a top trade liaison. What sets her apart from many of her counterparts, and how has her worldview shaped her policymaking?

Read Now Show less

Subscribe to GZERO Media's newsletter, Signal

Latest