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How medical technology will transform human life - Siddhartha Mukherjee
How medical technology will transform human life | Siddhartha Mukherjee | Ian Bremmer | GZERO World

How medical technology will transform human life - Siddhartha Mukherjee

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer and Siddhartha Mukherjee explore the many ways medical technology will transform our lives and help humans surpass physical and mental limitations. Mukherjee, a cancer physician and biologist, believes artificial intelligence will help create whole categories of new medicines. AI can spit out molecules with properties we didn’t even know existed, which has tantalizing implications for diseases currently thought to be incurable. Recently discovered treatments for things like spinal muscular dystrophy, which used to be almost certainly deadly but is now being treated with gene therapy, are just the beginning of what could be possible using tools like CRISPR gene editing or bionic prosthetics.

Mukherjee envisions a future where people who are paralyzed by disease or stroke can walk again, where people with speech impairments can talk to their loved ones, and where prosthetics become much more effective and integrated into our bodies. And beyond curing ailments, biotechnology can help improve the lives of healthy people, optimizing things like brain power and energy.

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Siddhartha Mukherjee: CRISPR, AI, and cloning could transform the human race
CRISPR, AI, and cloning could transform the human race | Siddhartha Mukherjee | GZERO World

Siddhartha Mukherjee: CRISPR, AI, and cloning could transform the human race

Technologies like CRISPR gene editing, synthetic biology, bionics integrated with AI, and cloning will create "new humans," says Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee.

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer sits down with the cancer physician and biologist to discuss some of the recent groundbreaking developments in medical technology that are helping to improve the human condition. Mukherjee points to four tools that have sped up our understanding of how the human body works: gene editing with CRISPR, AI-powered prosthetics, cloning, and synthetic biology. Gene editing with CRISPR allows humans to make precise alterations in the genome and synthetic biology means you can create a genome similar to writing a computer code.

“That technology is groundbreaking, and it really shook our worlds because I hadn’t expected it,” Mukherjee says.

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Ian Explains: Will biotech breakthroughs lead to super humans?
Ian Explains: Will biotech breakthroughs lead to super humans?

Ian Explains: Will biotech breakthroughs lead to super humans?

Medical technology could lead to a new breed of super humans.

On Ian Explains, Ian Bremmer looks at the evolution of human enhancement, tracing its roots from ancient history to recent ground-breaking tools like CRISPR gene editing, AI-powered prosthetics, and brain implants. These advances hint at a future of disease eradication, independence from physical disability, and recovery from traumatic brain injury. In a few short years, they’ve radically expanded the possibilities of how technology can improve the human experience and extend our lives.

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CRISPR and the gene-editing revolution
Ian Bremmer Explains: CRISPR and the Gene-Editing Revolution | GZERO World

CRISPR and the gene-editing revolution

CRISPR stands for Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats. You don't have to remember that, but you should know that this new gene editing technique can literally change life as we know it. Through CRISPR, scientists are now able to precisely edit DNA sequences in living things. They hope to be able to cure genetic diseases like sickle cell anemia and hereditary blindness. CRISPR may even be used to treat cancer and HIV. There's a darker side to CRISPR. What about engineering soldiers who can fight without fear or pain? Many argue that using CRISPR technology—for good or bad—amounts to playing God and that its use should be halted altogether. Others, like the World Health Organization, see enormous potential for the science but want to put limits on its application to prevent humanity from bringing out our own worst traits. Ian Bremmer explains what we know and don't know about the brave new world of gene editing.

Watch the episode: CRISPR gene editing and the human race

You can clone your pet
How CRISPR Could Help You Clone Your Pet | GZERO World

You can clone your pet

What if you never had to say goodbye to your best four-legged friend? That's right, now you can clone your dog, as long as you can spare anywhere between $50,000 and 100,000. It's legal in the US as well as countries like China or South Korea, where one chihuahua has been copied an outstanding 49 times. GZERO World takes a look.

Watch the episode: CRISPR gene editing and the human race

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