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CRISPR and the gene-editing revolution

CRISPR stands for Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats. You don't have to remember that, but you should know that this new gene editing technique can literally change life as we know it. Through CRISPR, scientists are now able to precisely edit DNA sequences in living things. They hope to be able to cure genetic diseases like sickle cell anemia and hereditary blindness. CRISPR may even be used to treat cancer and HIV. There's a darker side to CRISPR. What about engineering soldiers who can fight without fear or pain? Many argue that using CRISPR technology—for good or bad—amounts to playing God and that its use should be halted altogether. Others, like the World Health Organization, see enormous potential for the science but want to put limits on its application to prevent humanity from bringing out our own worst traits. Ian Bremmer explains what we know and don't know about the brave new world of gene editing.

Watch the episode: CRISPR gene editing and the human race

What is CRISPR? Gene editing pioneer Jennifer Doudna explains

What is CRISPR? Jennifer Doudna explains You may have heard of CRISPR, but don't know exactly what it is, or how it works. Ian Bremmer asked Jennifer Doudna, who won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her work on this gene-editing technology. CRISPR, she says, basically allows scientists to not only study but also make precise, targeted changes to DNA, the "code of life." Find out more in her interview on GZERO World.

Watch the episode: https://www.gzeromedia.com/crispr-gene-editing-and-the-human-race

CRISPR gene editing and the human race

Berkeley scientist Jennifer Doudna won the 2020 Nobel Prize for her work on the revolutionary gene-editing technology known as CRISPR. It has the potential to cure genetic diseases like sickle cell anemia and hereditary blindness and may even be used to treat cancer and HIV. But when it comes to editing humanity, where do we draw the line? How do we avoid falling into the same kind of dystopian nightmare outlined in Blade Runner? Doudna discussed the risks and benefits of CRISPR in an interview with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World. Also in this episode: a look at cloning our pets (speaking of going too far…).

Podcast: Gene editing tech risks and rewards: Dr. Jennifer Doudna's perspective

Listen: In a wide-ranging interview with Ian Bremmer, Nobel Prize-winning scientist Jennifer Doudna discusses her groundbreaking work on the revolutionary gene-editing technology known as CRISPR. In their conversation she explains what CRISPR is and why it has the potential to cure diseases and fend off viruses. She also talks about the limits of this technology and advocates for a global policy consensus on what limitations there should be around gene editing. Policymakers must also factor in income inequality, Doudna argues, given how expensive CRISPR currently is and the potential it has to change so many lives.

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CRISPR gene-editing tech should have limits, says Nobel laureate Jennifer Doudna

For Jennifer Doudna, who won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her work on CRISPR gene editing, there are some red lines we shouldn't cross (yet). The technology, she says, has "the potential to do incredible things and make incredible advances that will be beneficial to our society, but hand-in-hand with that go these large risks." One is human embryos, but that doesn't mean that in the future we shouldn't be able to use CRISPR on ourselves, for instance to protect us from diseases. Watch her interview with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Watch our live event: global health beyond the pandemic

Could the biggest health crisis of our lifetimes actually lead to a healthier world? Watch the second part of our live event series about what public health will look like after the COVID-19 pandemic, presented in partnership with Flagship Pioneering, the bio-platform company that founded Moderna and dozens of other life sciences firms.

Days before world leaders G7 meeting, we will bring political leaders and policy makers together with health experts and scientists to discuss lessons learned from and the latest innovations to preempt both COVID-19 variants and future infectious disease pandemics.

Attendance is free and open to the public. Please register to attend.

The virtual event will be hosted by Noubar Afeyan, founder & CEO of Flagship Pioneering, and Ian Bremmer, president and founder of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media.

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Register to join: two-day event on health beyond the pandemic

As the world works toward a post-pandemic state, join GZERO Media on June 8 and 9 for a two-part live event on health security, in partnership with Flagship Pioneering (which founded Moderna).

Days before this year's G7 meeting, we will bring political leaders and policy makers together with health experts and scientists to discuss lessons learned from and the latest innovations to preempt both COVID-19 variants and future infectious disease pandemics. The virtual event will be hosted by Noubar Afeyan, founder & CEO of Flagship Pioneering, and Ian Bremmer, president and founder of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media.

Attendance is free and open to the public. Please register to attend.

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Operation Warp Speed: Does credit for Moderna’s COVID vaccine go to the US taxpayer?

Without the help of the US government initiative "Operation Warp Speed," Moderna co-founder Noubar Afeyan says that it would have been impossible for the company to develop and deliver its vaccine so quickly. The fact, he says, that the American people may be days away from receiving its first doses is, in large part, thanks to their taxpayer dollars. Does President Trump, himself, deserve credit? "Without caveat," Afeyan says. He spoke with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Watch the GZERO World episode: A Shot in the Arm: Moderna's Co-Founder on the COVID-19 Vaccine

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