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From CRISPR to cloning: The science of new humans
From CRISPR to cloning: The science of new humans | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

From CRISPR to cloning: The science of new humans

The benefits and risks of human enhancement using CRISPR, AI, and synthetic biology.

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer sits down with physician and biologist Siddhartha Mukherjee to explore the recent advances, benefits, and risks of human enhancement with technology. Mukherjee’s latest book, “The Song of the Cell,” explores the history and medical science behind “the new humans,” a term he uses to describe people who have been altered in some way, initially for medical purposes and, potentially in the future, for enhancement. Bremmer and Mukherjee discuss the transformative impact of new tools like CRISPR gene-editing, AI-powered prosthetics, and brain implants that can help treat everything from movement disorders to depression.

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Podcast: Tracking the rapid rise of human-enhancing biotech with Siddhartha Mukherjee

In the past decade, we’ve seen an explosion in medical and biotechnologies like gene editing with CRISPR, synthetic organs, cloning, and AI-powered prosthetics that are helping to eradicate disease, improve the human condition, and enhance our brain power. These developments have radically transformed our understanding of the human body and what we thought was possible. But like most new tech, there’s also potential for misuse, privacy concerns, and ethical implications. Gene editing can cure debilitating diseases but also lead to designer babies. AI learning algorithms can power neural implants but also potentially create new chemical weapons.

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Steven Pinker shares his "relentless optimism" about human progress
Steven Pinker shares his "relentless optimism" about human progress | GZERO World

Steven Pinker shares his "relentless optimism" about human progress

If you follow the news closely, chances are your view of the state of the world is not super optimistic. From war in Ukraine to a warming planet to global poverty and hunger, there's plenty to get upset about. But what if things are actually getting...better? That's what Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker asks in his interview with Ian Bremmer for the latest episode of GZERO World.

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Why human beings are so easily fooled by AI, psychologist Steven Pinker explains
Why human beings are so easily fooled by AI, psychologist Steven Pinker explains | GZERO World

Why human beings are so easily fooled by AI, psychologist Steven Pinker explains

There's no question that AI will change the world, but the verdict is still out on exactly how. But one thing that is already clear: people are going to confuse it with humans. And we know this because it's already happening. That's according to Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker, who joined Ian Bremmer on GZERO World for a wide-ranging conversation about his surprisingly optimistic outlook on the world and the way that AI may affect it.

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Is life better than ever for the human race?
Is life better than ever? Measuring human progress today | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Is life better than ever for the human race?

Was the Beatles' Paul McCartney right - is it getting better all the time? On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer and Harvard psychologist Stephen Pinker talk about human progress and how we define it. Sure, it's great that we're not currently being chased by saber-toothed tigers. Life is better than death. Health is preferable to sickness. Freedom? We'll take it over tyranny any day of the week. In short, we know life is better today than it was for most of our ancestors, but how do we measure that progress? And at what point does the technology that has improved our lives come back to bite us? We're looking at you, AI.
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Ian Explains: Is the world better today thanks to human progress?
How do we define progress as humans? | GZERO Media

Ian Explains: Is the world better today thanks to human progress?

Human progress doesn’t have a finish line.

Our body clocks stop ticking at some point, but that’s not the same as reaching a destination, or achieving a goal. So how do we—as a community, as a country...as a world—define progress? What does “better” even look like?

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