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Law Enforcement & Tech; Facebook Staff Concerns; Musk vs Bezos

Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, helps us make sense of today's stories in technology:

What kind of technology is law enforcement using in their standoff with protesters?

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Trump vs Twitter; Civilians in Space?

Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, explains the feud between Trump and Twitter and weighs in on Elon Musk's ambitious space plans:

What is happening between Trump and Twitter?

A lot. Twitter decided it had to fact check the president because the president said something that wasn't entirely true, and perhaps was false, about voting. Twitter cares a lot about lies about voting. So, they fact check Trump. Trump got really mad, said he's going to get rid of some of the laws that protect Twitter from liability when people say bad things on their platform. That started war number one.

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Ian Bremmer: How COVID-19 Response Could Impact Civil Liberties

Ian Bremmer examines big tech's role in helping to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, and provides historical examples of expansion of government power in times of crisis, including the 1918 flu pandemic, the Sedition Act, and the 9/11 attacks. At a critical moment when both tech companies and the government are extending their reach and power, a tradeoff could emerge on the balance of safety and civil liberty.

Technological Revolution & Surveillance in the COVID-19 Era

Are we in the middle of a technological revolution?

Yes? I feel like a technological revolution should feel more empowering and exciting. It should feel like something good as opposed to something catastrophic. But if you define it as a moment when there's a lot of technological change that will last for years or decades, yes. Think about the way that health, education, working from home are going to change. There are lots of inventions right now because of coronavirus that will stick with us.

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Evaluating Data Privacy & Regulation in the US

How much regulation and oversight should the US government have when it comes to big tech? In an interview with Ian Bremmer for GZERO World, Marietje Schaake, former member of EU Parliament and international policy director of the Cyber Policy Center at Stanford University, argues that government relies on private tech firms for much of its own tech and data infrastructure, and that could be against the interest of citizens and consumers. Using examples of election security and misinformation promulgated in the COVID-19 pandemic, Schaake discusses the competing nature of profit-driven advertising platforms and the public good.

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