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The US and EU further talks on technology governance

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

Hello, and welcome to the new Cyber In 60 Seconds. My name is Marietje Schaake, and you're finding me at the Democracy Forum in Athens. So, from my hotel room, I'm looking back at the Trade and Technology Council that took place in Pittsburgh this week.

For those who missed it, this gathering brought together high-level officials from the Biden administration and the European Commission. It was a long-anticipated meeting that was supposed to reach conclusions about a shared governance agenda for tech-related issues like AI, data, semiconductors, and foreign direct investments. But the Trade and Technology Council was also expected and hoped to mark a new start after very difficult years across the Atlantic. I think we all remember the years when President Trump was still in the White House. And thankfully, the August fallout and French anger did not end up pouring cold water over the events. Although, the general sentiment in Europe that the honeymoon weeks are over is widely shared.

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Want Africa to grow? Get people and businesses online: Africa expert

There's a big opportunity for African countries to take advantage of the pandemic — if they can get online. "Greater internet connectivity can accelerate growth in tremendous ways," says Eurasia Group's top Africa analyst Amaka Anku. One of them would be formalizing the informal sector, which is very large and hard to tax: "It's much easier if people are paying using digital payments," she explains, but governments also need to do their part by cutting red tape to encourage investment.

Anku weighed in during a Global Stage livestream conversation hosted by GZERO Media in partnership with Microsoft during the 76th UN General Assembly.

Learn more: Should internet be free for everyone? A Global Stage debate

How can we bridge the "digital Grand Canyon"?

The UN likes to say that having half the world's population offline is like a "digital Grand Canyon" of exclusion. So, how can we bridge it? The International Communications Union's Doreen Bogdan-Martin says that the only way is to get all concerned parties — the UN, governments, international institutions, the private sector, and civil society — to work together. "No one can do this alone. We need all hands on deck."

Bogdan-Martin weighed in during a Global Stage livestream conversation hosted by GZERO Media in partnership with Microsoft during the 76th UN General Assembly.

Learn more: Should internet be free for everyone? A Global Stage debate

We'll never fix America's internet without measuring access properly, says FCC chair

Jessica Rosenworcel, acting chair of the US Federal Communications Commission, says mapping the real state of America's broadband access is flawed because a single subscriber in a rural area doesn't mean everyone is online. "You don't have to be a data maven to understand that that likely overstates service," she notes, and underscores the need to develop more accurate systems. "We're never going to manage the problems we don't measure."

Rosenworcel weighed in during a Global Stage livestream conversation hosted by GZERO Media in partnership with Microsoft during the 76th UN General Assembly.

Learn more: Should internet be free for everyone? A Global Stage debate

What is CRISPR? Gene editing pioneer Jennifer Doudna explains

What is CRISPR? Jennifer Doudna explains You may have heard of CRISPR, but don't know exactly what it is, or how it works. Ian Bremmer asked Jennifer Doudna, who won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her work on this gene-editing technology. CRISPR, she says, basically allows scientists to not only study but also make precise, targeted changes to DNA, the "code of life." Find out more in her interview on GZERO World.

Watch the episode: https://www.gzeromedia.com/crispr-gene-editing-and-the-human-race

Podcast: Gene editing tech risks and rewards: Dr. Jennifer Doudna's perspective

Listen: In a wide-ranging interview with Ian Bremmer, Nobel Prize-winning scientist Jennifer Doudna discusses her groundbreaking work on the revolutionary gene-editing technology known as CRISPR. In their conversation she explains what CRISPR is and why it has the potential to cure diseases and fend off viruses. She also talks about the limits of this technology and advocates for a global policy consensus on what limitations there should be around gene editing. Policymakers must also factor in income inequality, Doudna argues, given how expensive CRISPR currently is and the potential it has to change so many lives.

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.

CRISPR gene-editing tech should have limits, says Nobel laureate Jennifer Doudna

For Jennifer Doudna, who won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her work on CRISPR gene editing, there are some red lines we shouldn't cross (yet). The technology, she says, has "the potential to do incredible things and make incredible advances that will be beneficial to our society, but hand-in-hand with that go these large risks." One is human embryos, but that doesn't mean that in the future we shouldn't be able to use CRISPR on ourselves, for instance to protect us from diseases. Watch her interview with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Russian hackers found targeting US election; robots that write?

Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, helps us make sense of today's stories in technology:

What are the Russians doing to the US election?

Well, they are trying to hack it. They're trying to hack into the accounts of individuals working on campaigns. They're trying to hack into accounts of nonprofit organizations. They're trying to mess it all up again. They're probably trying to help their favorite candidate, too. How did we find out about it? Well, Microsoft, thank you Microsoft, is running an election security operation and they noticed this. Now, have they found everything that the Russian group Fancy Bear is doing? I highly doubt it. We'll probably learn a lot more after the election, unfortunately.

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