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Luisa Vieira

The Graphic Truth: The World Cup of graft

FIFA, the governing body of world soccer, has long been tainted with corruption scandals — and the 2022 edition of its top competition is no exception. The World Cup is being held in Qatar despite the fact that even FIFA itself "admitted" that bribes were exchanged before the tiny emirate with zero soccer tradition got the nod in late 2010. But what about the countries whose national teams qualified for the tournament? We take a look at how the most and least corrupt countries would play against each other as soccer teams on a pitch. Note: if you're missing Saudi Arabia, believe it or not it ranks as less graft-ridden than Croatia.

A sculpture of the World Cup trophy is pictured in front of Khalifa International Stadium in Doha.

Reuters

Will politics or soccer win Qatar's World Cup?

Sunday is the day half the world has been eagerly awaiting for four years. The men's soccer World Cup — the most-watched event of the most popular sport on the planet — kicks off in, of all places, Qatar.

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US Women’s National Soccer Team Continues Fight for Equal Pay | GZERO World

US women soccer team’s fight for equal pay "because we're clearly the dominant team"

The World Cup-winning US women's soccer team won its sixth medal (bronze) in the Tokyo Olympics, and it's arguably the world's best squad in recent years. Meanwhile, the national women's team just filed its first brief to appeal an equal pay lawsuit ruling against the US Soccer Federation, one year after a judge rejected their claim that they were underpaid compared to the (way less successful) men's squad. GZERO World gets the latest on what comes next from two-time gold medalist and World Cup champion goalkeeper Briana Scurry and their lawyers.

Watch the episode: Politics, protest & the Olympics: the IOC's Dick Pound

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