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How has the pandemic influenced climate action?

Kevin Sneader, global managing partner for McKinsey & Company, provides perspective on how the pandemic has influenced climate action:

Has the pandemic helped or harmed efforts to tackle climate change?

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Three steps to get remote & hybrid learning right

Kevin Sneader, global managing partner for McKinsey & Company, provides perspective on how corporate business leaders think in response to the coronavirus crisis:

How do we get remote and hybrid learning right?

For many, this is the back to school season. But this year's preparations are fraught with added anxiety as educators, public health officials, and parents try to balance the need to reduce the spread of the virus with a desire to get students into more productive learning environments. For many students, a full time return to the classroom will not be safe for some time. It's important to understand three lessons in order to get remote and hybrid learning right.

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HR Reset: Post-COVID Lessons for Growth

Kevin Sneader, global managing partner for McKinsey & Company, provides perspective on how corporate business leaders think in response to the coronavirus crisis:

What is the role of HR going into the next normal?

Well, this is a time of reset and one big reset that I see is around the role of HR. I think it's time for HR to shift from being a transactional partner around compensation, organization charts, and benefits to being a truly integral architect of change. Now, that's been happening for years in the best performing HR departments. It Involves rethinking talent requirements, capturing what was learned about individuals and organizations during the course of this pandemic, and even learning and growing in a world in which remote working has to be combined with working back in the office or the manufacturing facility. A world where incentives needs to be rethought. And where employee experiences need to reflect a very different reality. So, there's a big reset going on and I think that reset needs to embrace HR both in terms of what HR can do, the role of the CHR role, and indeed the way in which together HR becomes a true architect for change, just as it has done for many years, perhaps unnoticed, and not give enough credit by those who really should know better.

Ensuring access to technology for all is critical during a pandemic

Kevin Sneader, Global Managing Partner at McKinsey, shares his perspective on corporate business leadership on Business In 60 Seconds:

How can technology be a force for good?

Well, we've been living through a pandemic where in many ways, technology has come to the rescue. Imagine how society, business, and communities would have fared if technology had not been up to the challenge that we've all been facing. In health, artificial intelligence is accelerating the development of vaccines. Analytics are providing us new ways to set about all tasks that confront us in this next normal. Education, while remote schooling is far from perfect, but it has helped millions of children get an education when otherwise they would have not been able to gain one. And even in inclusion, technology has enabled flexibility for those desperately in need of it, when they cannot go to the office, they cannot go to the manufacturing facility. And in the environments case, emissions have been reduced by applying technology to bring people together, where airlines no longer travel. So, the challenge now, how to bridge the divide between those who have access to technology and those who do not. That is really the challenge and one to which I will return, because the answer to the question of can technology be a force for good has been resoundingly answered. The question now is how to ensure everyone has access to it.

Learnings from working post-COVID: economy, work-life, leadership

Kevin Sneader, Global Managing Partner at McKinsey, shares his perspective on corporate business leadership on Business In 60 Seconds:

What do we know now that we did not know four months ago when the coronavirus struck with vengeance?

I think there's a lot. First, we've learned about our economy. We know that we've now taken the elevator down and we're taking the stairs back up. We're seeing a return, as I observe what's happening across the world, but from a very low base. And the letter of choice is not an L, a V or a U, but I think it's a big question mark.

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