What We're Watching: Bloomberg's debut, Assad's victory, a big Caribbean glitch

Bloomberg takes the stage – Tomorrow's Democratic debate will be the first to feature media tycoon Mike Bloomberg, who in recent weeks has thrown hundreds of millions of dollars behind an ad campaign designed to position himself as a viable, moderate candidate who can beat Trump. As his support in national polls has climbed to nearly 20 percent, Bloomberg – who largely sat out the earlier rounds of Democratic campaigning – has come under attack for sexist comments in the past as well as his support, as NYC mayor, for "stop and frisk" policing tactics that disproportionately targeted people of color. Bloomberg will immediately be at war not only with the moderates whom he wants to displace – Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, and Joe Biden – but especially with the front running left-progressive Bernie Sanders. It will likely be quite ugly and we're certainly tuning in.


A Caribbean election glitch – The Dominican Republic was forced to halt nationwide municipal elections on Monday after half of the electronic devices used to count votes in some of the country's most populous regions failed to load virtual ballots. The glitch created huge lines outside polling stations and forced the government to reschedule the vote. Unlike the botched reporting app that ruffled the Iowa caucuses, this was a problem with the actual election machinery itself. The country is set to hold general elections in May – we're watching to see the impact of this fiasco on Dominicans' trust in their electoral system.

The horrific cost of Assad's "victory" – In rare remarks carried on Syria's state TV, President Bashar al-Assad congratulated his troops for recent major territorial gains in northwestern Syria. Assad declared the recapture of critical areas around Aleppo as the "prelude to complete victory" and pledged to move ahead with a military offensive in the rebel-bastion of Idlib province. The government's ferocious, Russian-backed offensive has displaced some 900,000 Syrians in the country's northwest since December, prompting the UN to warn that the nearly-decade long war has "reached a horrifying new level." We are watching to see what Assad does next, while also keeping a wary eye on ongoing tensions between Turkey and Russia who back opposing sides in northwestern Syria but have been trying to implement a cease-fire in Idlib province.

What We're Reading

Almost a million people in northwestern Syria have fled their homes over the past three months, braving airstrikes and freezing weather. This exceptional interactive from the New York Times chronicles what that actually looks like.


How will our cities and lives change in the future? What about a structure with a roller skating rink above a swimming pool, made out of transparent solar panels that power the entire park? This was the innovation invented by Eni's young researchers based on Luminescent Solar Concentrators, developed through Eni's research.

Watch the latest episode of Funny Applications, Eni's video series that imagines new uses for technology.

In an interview with GZERO World host Ian Bremmer, Hong Kong lawmaker Dennis Kwok, an outspoken pro-democracy advocate, expresses his concerns that the current "draconian" laws China's leadership is forcing upon his city has expedited the end of the "one country, two systems" policy established in 1997.

For 30 years, citizens of Hong Kong have gathered in Victoria Park on the evening of June 4 to honor the peaceful protesters massacred in Beijing's Tiananmen Square on that date in 1989. It has been the only public Tiananmen commemoration permitted on Chinese soil.

This year, the park was surrounded by barricades to keep people out. The officially stated reason for the shut-down? Crowds spread coronavirus. (In this city of more than 7 million, COVID has so far killed four people.)

More Show less

Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, helps us make sense of today's stories in technology:

What kind of technology is law enforcement using in their standoff with protesters?

More Show less

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Big news, of course, that former Secretary of Defense Mattis comes out with a public statement basically calling Trump's rule, his actions, unconstitutional and unfit for office, more divisive than any president he's ever seen.

More Show less