Hard Numbers: The Billion-Dollar Hacker

80: Secretary of State Mike Pompeo estimates that the US had already sanctioned more than 80 percent of Iran's economy even before new sanctions came into force this week against the country's Supreme Leader and other politicians. The screws are certainly tightening, but the US is also running out of things to sanction.

2137: The computer science field is so dominated by men that, at current rates of progress it would take until the year 2137 for the number of papers written by women to equal those written by their male colleagues, according to a new study cited by Steve Levine at Axios Future.

71: A poll from the crucial US swing state of Florida finds that 71percent of the state's voters (and 85 percent of local Democrats) not only believe in climate change, but want to see the government take concrete measures to address global warming. That makes sense: over the past year, roughly a third of Floridians have had to invest in protecting their homes better against weather-related events.

1 billion: It's no secret that North Korea engages in hacking and cyberattacks in order to get money, but a UN report estimates that between 2015 and 2018, a single North Korean hacker netted more than $1 billion for the Hermit Kingdom. For context, the FT notes that Pyongyang was clocking about $500 million a year in arms sales in the mid-2000s.

The world is at a turning point. Help shape our future by taking this one-minute survey from the United Nations. To mark its 75th anniversary, the UN is capturing people's priorities for the future, and crowdsourcing solutions to global challenges. The results will shape the UN's work to recover better from COVID-19, and ensure its plans reflect the views of the global public. Take the survey here.

Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro tested positive for the coronavirus on Tuesday. To understand what that means for the country's politics and public health policy, GZERO sat down with Christopher Garman, top Brazil expert at our parent company, Eurasia Group. The exchange has been lightly edited for clarity and concision.

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The Trump administration sent shockwaves through universities this week when it announced that international students in the US could be forced to return to their home countries if courses are not held in classrooms this fall. Around 1 million foreign students are now in limbo as they wait for institutions to formalize plans for the upcoming semester. But it's not only foreign students themselves who stand to lose out: International students infuse cash into American universities and contributed around $41 billion to the US economy in the 2018-19 academic year. So, where do most of these foreign students come from? We take a look here.

For years, the Philippines has struggled with domestic terrorism. Last Friday, Rodrigo Duterte signed into law a sweeping new anti-terror bill that has the opposition on edge, as the tough-talking president gears up to make broader constitutional changes. Here's a look at what the law does, and what it means for the country less than two years away from the next presidential election.

The legislation grants authorities broad powers to prosecute domestic terrorism, including arrests without a warrant and up to 24 days detention without charges. It also carries harsh penalties for those convicted of terror-related offenses, with a maximum sentence of life in prison without parole. Simply threatening to commit an act of terror on social media can now be punished with 12 years behind bars.

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16,000: Amid a deepening economic crisis in Lebanon that has wiped out people's savings and cratered the value of the currency, more than 16,000 people have joined a new Facebook group that enables people to secure staple goods and food through barter.

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