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From Olympic Games to War Games?

From Olympic Games to War Games?

That 13-year-old kid shredded Vivaldi like a young Korean Yngwie. Ivanka was the smartest person and clapped for everyone. The Olympic torch took off for Tokyo and — despite the sporting rapprochement between North and South that happened at the Winter Games — we’re now back to the acute geopolitical crisis surrounding North Korea’s nuclear program.


Despite the Olympian goodwill, the basic parameters of the standoff haven’t changed since the Opening Ceremony. North Korea wants a nuclear weapon that can hit the continental US. Washington wants to strip North Korea of its nuclear capacity altogether. Kim Jong-un seems unfazed — nuclear weapons are an existential matter for him. The Chinese are annoyed with Kim, but still unwilling to push him to the brink of collapse just to stop him for the Americans. And so it’s deadlock.

But two things are likely to inflame tensions further in the coming months. First, the regularly-scheduled joint US and South Korean military drills, which were postponed in order to avoid piquing Pyongyang during the Olympic games, are likely to go ahead. Second, seeing that the thaw with Seoul appears not to have warmed hearts in Washington, Kim Jong-un is almost certain to test another big missile before long.

The big question here is whether he’ll attempt his own triple-axel move: a horizontal missile test across the Pacific coupled with an atmospheric test of a bomb. Doing that might be beyond the pale even for Kim — but then again, the pale’s been steadily moving out for a while now…

Chapter 5 of Eni's Story of CO2 is left unwritten, as the world must decide how to move forward with the use of fossil fuels. Though doing nothing is not an option, using natural gas is. A safer alternative to fossil fuels that releases half as much CO2, natural gas can meet the world's energy needs as we wait for renewable technologies to advance and scale.

Learn more about the future of energy in the final episode of Eni's Story of CO2 series.

Call it a counter-counter-revolution at the ballot box. One year after mass protests over election irregularities drove Bolivia's long-serving leftist populist President Evo Morales from office, his preferred candidate has won the presidency — possibly by a landslide.

But can the country's new leader, a soft-spoken economist named Luis Arce, move the country beyond the political trauma of the past year?

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Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Hi, everybody. Ian Bremmer here. Yet another exciting week in the run-up to the US elections. Not the only thing going on, though, not at all. I mean, first of all, coronavirus continues to be by far the biggest story in the US, in Europe, as we have a major second wave, and indeed in many countries around the world. Also, we're seeing a lot more instability pop up. I mean, we've had every Sunday now for about three months massive unprecedented protests in Belarus. They're not slowing down at all. We see major demonstrations, including anti-royal demonstrations in Thailand, Pakistan. You've got significant instability right now, of course, we'd seen in Lebanon over the past months. Why is this all going on? Is this a GZERO phenomenon?

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Build that wall... in Greece: The Greek government has finalized plans to build a wall along part of its eastern border with Turkey to prevent migrants from staging mass crossings to reach European Union territory. The move follows a March standoff between Athens and Ankara when Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan declared he was "opening" the border because Turkey could no longer cope with so many migrants fleeing Syria. Since then, migrant flows via Turkey to the EU have declined dramatically due to the coronavirus pandemic and tougher policing, but Greeks and Turks (as always) remain at odds over what to do with the migrants: Greece wants Turkey to do more to stop migrants crossing, while Turkey says Greece is sending back migrants who arrive at Greek islands in the Aegean Sea. As the two sides continue to bicker over this issue — and over energy rights in the Eastern Mediterranean — the only thing that's clear is that Greece won't demand that Turkey pay for the wall.

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Three years ago, long before anyone had ever heard of COVID-19, a different kind of virus spread around the world: a piece of malicious software code launched by a nation state. It paralyzed computer networks in hundreds of countries, disrupted global shipping, forced pharmaceutical factories to shut down, and inflicted an estimated $10 billion of economic damage.

On the physical battlefield, a widely accepted set of rules, backed by international law, governs conduct, with the aim of protecting soldiers and civilians. Establishing common rules or guardrails is much harder in cyberspace, where borders can't be easily defined and the tools and tactics of combat are always changing. But it has never been more urgent.

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