Watching/Ignoring

WHAT WE’RE WATCHING

The Tunisian Gravedigger  Chamseddine Marzoug walks the beaches of Zarzis, Tunisia looking for the bodies of those who drowned while trying to reach Europe by boat. When he finds a corpse, he lays it in a body bag and takes it to a nearby hospital for examination. Once a report is filed, he washes the body and takes it to a graveyard dedicated to the unknown dead. He then buries the bodies in graves he has dug himself. In the process, he treats these unfortunate men, women, and children with a care and dignity they may never have known in life.


Cortlandt Street Station  After 17 years, New York’s Cortlandt Streetsubway station, nearly destroyed by the collapse of the World Trade Center towers on September 11, 2001, has officially reopened. It’s disorienting to see a shiny, clean station anywhere in New York City, but those who work on Wall Street are glad to finally have it back.

WHAT WE’RE IGNORING

Russian alibis – Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov, accused by British authorities of the poisoning attack on former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter in Salisbury in March, told the Russian state-run RT channel they were in the UK as tourists when the Skripals were poisoned with a rare nerve agent sprayed on Skripal’s front door. The two men say they are sports nutrition salesmen who visited Salisbury only to see the famously tall spire atop its cathedral. British officials say the two men work for Russian military intelligence and that police have surveillance footage of the two men near Skripal’s home.

Russian threats – Viktor Zolotov is fighting mad. This former bodyguard to Vladimir Putin posted a challenge on YouTube in response to what he says are false corruption charges levelled against him by Kremlin gadfly and anti-corruption activist Alexei Navalny. “Nobody has ever given you the spanking you deserve, so hard that you felt it in your liver,” warned Zolotov. “I simply challenge you to a duel… I promise in several minutes to make a nice juicy steak out of you.” Colorful threats, but the Petrov/Boshirov interviews were more entertaining.

Imagine losing your child in their first year of life and having no idea what caused it. This is the heartbreaking reality for thousands of families each year who lose a child to Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID). Despite decades-long efforts to prevent SUID, it remains the leading cause of death for children between one month and one year of age in developed nations. Working in collaboration with researchers at Seattle Children's Research Institute and the University of Auckland, Microsoft analyzed the Center for Disease Control (CDC) data on every child born in the U.S. over a decade, including over 41 million births and 37,000 SUID deaths.

By pairing Microsoft's capabilities and data scientists with Seattle Children's medical research expertise, progress is being made on identifying the cause of SUID. Earlier this year, a study was published that estimated approximately 22% of SUID deaths in the U.S. were attributable to maternal cigarette-smoking during pregnancy, giving us further evidence that, through our collaboration with experts in varying disciplines, we are getting to the root of this problem and making remarkable advances.

Read more at Microsoft On The Issues.

After a months-long investigation into whether President Donald Trump pressured Ukraine's president into investigating his political rivals in order to boost his reelection prospects in 2020, House Democrats brought two articles of impeachment against him, charging him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Click here for our GZERO guide to what comes next.

In the meantime, imagine for a moment that you are now Mitch McConnell, Senate Majority leader and senior member of Donald Trump's Republican Party. You've got big choices to make.

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After a months-long investigation into whether President Donald Trump pressured Ukraine's president into investigating his political rivals in order to boost his reelection prospects in 2020, House Democrats on Tuesday brought two articles of impeachment against him. They charge Trump with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

So, what are the next steps?

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Trump gets his deal – House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced yesterday that Democrats will back the USMCA, the US-Mexico-Canada trade agreement that will replace the North American Free Trade Agreement. Crucially, the bill will also have support from the nation's largest labor union. This is a major political victory for President Trump, who promised he would close this deal, but it's also good for Pelosi: it shows that the Democrats' House majority can still accomplish big things even as it impeaches the president. But with the speed of the Washington news cycle these days, we're watching to see if anyone is still talking about USMCA three days after it's signed.

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1.5 million: China said it has "returned to society" some 1.5 million mainly Muslim Uighurs detained in internment camps in Xinjiang. The detainees were released after "graduating" from vocational training, according to Beijing, but increasing international criticism and a string of damning media exposes are believed to have pressured China to release them.

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