The Graphic Truth: Who depends the most on tourists?

Few sectors of the global economy are immune from pandemic-induced economic pain right now, but some find comfort in the fact they will bounce-back in the near or medium-term. The travel business, which has been brought to a standstill as billions of people have been forced to stay home, may not be one of those lucky industries. As social distancing will likely remain a reality until a COVID-19 vaccine is made available – a process that could still take 12-18 months – people's appetite to take foreign holidays is unlikely to bounce back in a big way. And many countries will keep their borders closed to non-residents for months to come, as fears of contagion persist. This is a huge blow for countries that rely on tourism to pump cash into their economies. Travel contributed a whopping $8.8 trillion to the global economy in 2018 and was responsible for 10.4 percent of all economic activity around the world. So, which large economies stand to lose the most from the tourism downturn? Take a look.

Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan announced a $1 billion, four-year commitment of additional support to address economic and racial inequalities in our local communities that have been intensified by the global pandemic.

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Have you heard? The Republican president of the United States proposed a plan for "partial basic income" and his plan passed the House of Representatives. In 1968.

President's Nixon's plan, which he called "the most significant piece of social legislation in our nation's history," died in the Senate and never became law. It hasn't really made a comeback in the US. But the idea of "guaranteed basic income" is already back in the news in Europe, because income inequality — exacerbated by COVID-19 — will become increasingly hard for the world's political leaders to ignore.

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As protests over the police killing of George Floyd raged across the country, there have been more than 125 instances of journalists being shot with rubber bullets by police, arrested, or in some cases assaulted by protesters while covering the unrest.

Foreign news crews from Germany and Australia have been caught up in the crackdown. Australia's Prime Minister has even called for an investigation. Some of these journalists have simply been caught in the crossfire during surges of unrest, but video and photographic evidence reveals cases where police have deliberately targeted reporters doing their jobs.

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600,000: French authorities said 600,000 residents downloaded its new coronavirus contact tracing up within the first few hours of its release. The app, which aims to prevent a second wave of infections in that hard-hit country, has stirred controversy in France amid concerns that the data it gathers could be abused by the government to surveil people.

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As anti- racism protests rocked US cities in recent days, thousands of people gathered in cities around the world in solidarity. In some instances, demonstrators assembled outside US embassies — in Berlin, London, Paris, and elsewhere — to condemn the police killing of George Floyd. In others, crowds inspired by the Floyd demonstrations gathered to protest systemic racial injustice in their own societies. Here's a look at where demonstrators have taken to the streets in recent days.