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300 million: Since its February 15 release, a new Chinese sci-fi blockbuster, Wandering Earth, has brought in more than $300 million at the box office, making it one of the highest grossing films in the country's history. The movie details efforts by Earth's governments to save the planet from an unstable sun by attaching thrusters to the planet and ejecting it into another part of the universe in search of a new home. We leave it to you to decide what world leader the film's writers may have had metaphorically in mind.

$240,500: North Korean leader Kim Jong-un is sporting a fancy new limousine just weeks ahead of his second summit with President Trump. The Mercedes Maybach S-600 will doubtless impress Mr. Trump, but we can't help noting that 2018 model's retail price of $240,500 is almost 200 times the per capita income of Mr. Kim's country.

1,000: After winning power in Madya Pradesh, India's fifth largest state, the opposition Congress party announced a plan to build 1,000 new shelters there for cows, an animal widely revered by Hindus. As national elections approach later this year, the resurgent Congress party is trying to chip away at the ruling BJP's bona fides among Hindu nationalists.

86: As he starts his third month in office, Mexico's new president, the left-wing nationalist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, boasts an enviable 86 percent approval rating. His policy of going after fuel thieves remains his most popular initiative.

Khant Thaw Htoo is a young engineer who works in Eni's Sakura Tower office in the heart of Yangon. As an HSE engineer, he monitors the safety and environmental impact of onshore and offshore operations. He also looks out for his parents' well-being, in keeping with Myanmar's traditions.

Learn more about Khant in the final episode of the Faces of Eni series, which focuses on Eni's employees around the world.

On his first day as president, Joe Biden signed a remarkable series of executive orders. Boom! The US rejoins the Paris Climate Accord. Bang! The United States rejoins the World Health Organization. Pow! No more ban on immigration from many Muslim-majority countries. Biden's press secretary reminded reporters later in the day that all these orders merely begin complex processes that take time, but the impact is still dramatic.

If you lead a country allied with the US, or you're simply hoping for some specific commitment or clear and credible statement of purpose from the US government, you might feel a little dizzy today. The sight of an American president (Barack Obama) signing his name, of the next president (Donald Trump) erasing that name from the same legislation/bill, and then the following president (Biden) signing it back into law again will raise deep concerns over the long-term reliability of the world's still-most-powerful nation.

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10: Violent protests against new coronavirus restrictions have erupted in at least 10 regions in the Netherlands, which recently imposed the country's first nationwide curfew since World War Two. Protesters clashed with police and looted stores — and police say that a far-right anti-immigrant group has taken advantage of the discontent to exacerbate tensions.

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One result of the law enforcement crackdown on pro-Trump Capitol rioters following the events of January 6 is that many right-wing extremists have left public social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter for encrypted apps like Telegram and Signal. But renowned tech journalist Kara Swisher isn't all that concerned. "The white supremacist stuff, it's like mold. They thrived in the light, actually." Now that these groups no longer have such public platforms, their recruiting power, Swisher argues, will be greatly diminished. Plus, she points out, they were already on those encrypted apps to begin with. Swisher's conversation with Ian Bremmer was part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Renowned tech journalist Kara Swisher has no doubt that social media companies bear responsibility for the January 6th pro-Trump riots at the Capitol and will likely be complicit in the civil unrest that may continue well into Biden's presidency. It's no surprise, she argues, that the online rage that platforms like Facebook and Twitter intentionally foment translated into real-life violence. But if Silicon Valley's current role in our national discourse is untenable, how can the US government rein it in? That, it turns out, is a bit more complicated. Swisher joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

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