Hard Numbers: What does a cup of coffee cost in Venezuela?

79: Almost a decade since the Tunisian Revolution that marked the start of the Arab Spring, a majority of Tunisians remain disillusioned with the country's leadership: 79 percent of adults surveyed said that government corruption is widespread, according to a new Gallup poll. Many Tunisians doubt that the newly elected Ennahda party will improve living standards for everyday people.


98.5: Members of Ethiopia's Sidama ethnic group voted overwhelmingly to form their own self-governing region, with about 98.5 percent of voters backing the push for semi-autonomy. Since April 2018, Ethiopia has been plagued by ethnic violence that's caused some 3 million people to flee their homes.

200,000: The International Monetary Fund says inflation in Venezuela will hit 200,000 percent this year. Consider that a cup of coffee that cost 150 bolivars a year ago now costs 18,000 bolivars (see Bloomberg's cup-of-coffee inflation tracker here.) The silver lining? Things are better than a year ago, when inflation was 1 million percent.

63: A majority of Americans are deeply concerned about the privacy of their personal data. Sixty-three percent of adults surveyed believe that Uncle Sam is constantly collecting data about them and that they are powerless to prevent it, according to a recent Pew study.

Imagine losing your child in their first year of life and having no idea what caused it. This is the heartbreaking reality for thousands of families each year who lose a child to Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID). Despite decades-long efforts to prevent SUID, it remains the leading cause of death for children between one month and one year of age in developed nations. Working in collaboration with researchers at Seattle Children's Research Institute and the University of Auckland, Microsoft analyzed the Center for Disease Control (CDC) data on every child born in the U.S. over a decade, including over 41 million births and 37,000 SUID deaths.

By pairing Microsoft's capabilities and data scientists with Seattle Children's medical research expertise, progress is being made on identifying the cause of SUID. Earlier this year, a study was published that estimated approximately 22% of SUID deaths in the U.S. were attributable to maternal cigarette-smoking during pregnancy, giving us further evidence that, through our collaboration with experts in varying disciplines, we are getting to the root of this problem and making remarkable advances.

Read more at Microsoft On The Issues.

After a months-long investigation into whether President Donald Trump pressured Ukraine's president into investigating his political rivals in order to boost his reelection prospects in 2020, House Democrats brought two articles of impeachment against him, charging him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Click here for our GZERO guide to what comes next.

In the meantime, imagine for a moment that you are now Mitch McConnell, Senate Majority leader and senior member of Donald Trump's Republican Party. You've got big choices to make.

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After a months-long investigation into whether President Donald Trump pressured Ukraine's president into investigating his political rivals in order to boost his reelection prospects in 2020, House Democrats on Tuesday brought two articles of impeachment against him. They charge Trump with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

So, what are the next steps?

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Trump gets his deal – House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced yesterday that Democrats will back the USMCA, the US-Mexico-Canada trade agreement that will replace the North American Free Trade Agreement. Crucially, the bill will also have support from the nation's largest labor union. This is a major political victory for President Trump, who promised he would close this deal, but it's also good for Pelosi: it shows that the Democrats' House majority can still accomplish big things even as it impeaches the president. But with the speed of the Washington news cycle these days, we're watching to see if anyone is still talking about USMCA three days after it's signed.

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1.5 million: China said it has "returned to society" some 1.5 million mainly Muslim Uighurs detained in internment camps in Xinjiang. The detainees were released after "graduating" from vocational training, according to Beijing, but increasing international criticism and a string of damning media exposes are believed to have pressured China to release them.

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