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MANAGING EDITOR, SIGNAL NEWSLETTER

GZERO Media is seeking a managing editor for our newsletter, Signal. Launched in 2016, Signal has rapidly become a must-read newsletter on global politics. As managing editor, you will be responsible for executing the newsletter's expansion from three to five days a week, and you will devise a strategy to grow Signal's online presence. You will also oversee day-to-day editorial operations, contribute articles on a weekly basis, and represent Signal as a contributor on broadcast media outlets.

A strong candidate will have 7+ years' experience managing editorial operations for an online or print news publication, and extensive experience analyzing and writing about global affairs.

The Managing Editor will manage a team of multiple writers and editors in a fast-paced and news-cycle driven environment. You should have both expertise and experience in writing about international affairs. You should also have a strong and clear news sense, with clear convictions about what stories to cover every day of the week, and how to approach them with our unique perspective and voice.

You are comfortable with the demands of a fast-paced newsroom, including tight deadlines and sometimes long hours. You are a successful manager and collaborative leader. You measure success through both editorial excellence and commercial performance.

As a part of the interview process, you will be asked to submit two articles, complete a writing assessment and submit strategy notes that outline your thoughts about the future of Signal as a daily newsletter.

Qualifications:

  • 7+ years of experience as a journalist or editor at an online or written publication
  • Prior management of a team of journalists in a fast-paced, news-cycle driven environment
  • Good editorial intuition and strong convictions about global affairs news
  • Expertise in and experience writing about geopolitics is a must. Knowledge of the Asia-Pacific region and fluency in Mandarin or other Asian languages a plus
  • Experienced and comfortable appearing on live broadcast television
  • Highly organized, careful attention to detail, and a forward planner

GZERO Media is a company dedicated to providing the public with intelligent and engaging coverage of global affairs. It was created in 2017 as a subsidiary of Eurasia Group, the world's leading political risk analysis firm. Our coverage takes many forms – print, digital media and broadcast television. Find us at gzeromedia.com.

Start date: ASAP with full benefits.

Perks of working at GZERO Media:

  • Be a part of an exciting, fast-growing media venture centered around the analysis and explanation of international politics.
  • The opportunity to work with a talented and entrepreneurial team in a global environment.
  • Flexible work environment, with contemporary offices located in New York (Flatiron), DC (DuPont Circle) and London (Clerkenwell).
  • PTO bank of 23 days, 10 paid holidays and 2 summer Fridays.
  • A strong belief in work-life balance.
  • Competitive salary plus incentive compensation plan.
  • Rich benefits package – The firm contributes 82-90% to medical and dental premiums, 100% employer-paid LTD, STD and life insurance, 401(k) plus fully vested employer match and pre-tax commuter benefits.
  • Business casual dress code.

Eurasia Group is an equal opportunity employer.

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