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MANAGING EDITOR, SIGNAL NEWSLETTER

GZERO Media is seeking a managing editor for our newsletter, Signal. Launched in 2016, Signal has rapidly become a must-read newsletter on global politics. As managing editor, you will be responsible for executing the newsletter's expansion from three to five days a week, and you will devise a strategy to grow Signal's online presence. You will also oversee day-to-day editorial operations, contribute articles on a weekly basis, and represent Signal as a contributor on broadcast media outlets.

A strong candidate will have 7+ years' experience managing editorial operations for an online or print news publication, and extensive experience analyzing and writing about global affairs.

The Managing Editor will manage a team of multiple writers and editors in a fast-paced and news-cycle driven environment. You should have both expertise and experience in writing about international affairs. You should also have a strong and clear news sense, with clear convictions about what stories to cover every day of the week, and how to approach them with our unique perspective and voice.

You are comfortable with the demands of a fast-paced newsroom, including tight deadlines and sometimes long hours. You are a successful manager and collaborative leader. You measure success through both editorial excellence and commercial performance.

As a part of the interview process, you will be asked to submit two articles, complete a writing assessment and submit strategy notes that outline your thoughts about the future of Signal as a daily newsletter.

Qualifications:

  • 7+ years of experience as a journalist or editor at an online or written publication
  • Prior management of a team of journalists in a fast-paced, news-cycle driven environment
  • Good editorial intuition and strong convictions about global affairs news
  • Expertise in and experience writing about geopolitics is a must. Knowledge of the Asia-Pacific region and fluency in Mandarin or other Asian languages a plus
  • Experienced and comfortable appearing on live broadcast television
  • Highly organized, careful attention to detail, and a forward planner

GZERO Media is a company dedicated to providing the public with intelligent and engaging coverage of global affairs. It was created in 2017 as a subsidiary of Eurasia Group, the world's leading political risk analysis firm. Our coverage takes many forms – print, digital media and broadcast television. Find us at gzeromedia.com.

Start date: ASAP with full benefits.

Perks of working at GZERO Media:

  • Be a part of an exciting, fast-growing media venture centered around the analysis and explanation of international politics.
  • The opportunity to work with a talented and entrepreneurial team in a global environment.
  • Flexible work environment, with contemporary offices located in New York (Flatiron), DC (DuPont Circle) and London (Clerkenwell).
  • PTO bank of 23 days, 10 paid holidays and 2 summer Fridays.
  • A strong belief in work-life balance.
  • Competitive salary plus incentive compensation plan.
  • Rich benefits package – The firm contributes 82-90% to medical and dental premiums, 100% employer-paid LTD, STD and life insurance, 401(k) plus fully vested employer match and pre-tax commuter benefits.
  • Business casual dress code.

Eurasia Group is an equal opportunity employer.

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This week, the market value of Tencent, China's biggest video game company, nosedived after a state media outlet suggested that online gaming was as addictive and destructive as opium. Tencent immediately pledged to cap the number of hours people can play, and to keep minors off its platforms.

It's the latest example of a months-long crackdown on major Chinese technology firms that until recently were viewed as some of the world's most powerful and successful companies, as well as a source of national pride. Beijing's about-face on its own tech titans could have big implications for China, and beyond.

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Jon Lieber, Managing Director of the United States for Eurasia Group, shares updates on recent COVID-19 policy developments:

The Biden administration extended an eviction moratorium even after the Supreme Court said they couldn't, what's next?

Well, the CDC imposed a nationwide eviction moratorium in light of increased risk from evicted people because of the coronavirus pandemic. The Supreme Court in June ruled that they (CDC) overextended their authority in doing so and mandated that the moratorium expire on schedule in July. A group of progressive activists weren't happy about this and raised a huge stink in Congress, but Congress recessed for their August vacation before they could solve the problem, putting big pressure on President Biden to extend the moratorium even though he said he didn't think that it would pass constitutional muster. The CDC did it anyway, extending the moratorium until October 3rd, which is a time that's short enough to probably avoid it being overturned by lawsuits, but long enough that Congress has time to figure out how to either extend it on a bipartisan basis or put more money into a rental assistance fund that few people have taken advantage of so far. This whole incident shows the power of progressive activists in the Biden administration who were able to elevate the profile of this issue and potentially prevent millions of people from losing their homes this summer.

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Watch the episode: The (political) power of alcohol

Equestrian jumpers, and their horses, are disciplined species. They don't appreciate surprises very much.

But many participants were caught off guard during this week's individual jumping qualifiers in Tokyo by a very daunting statue of a sumo wrestler on the hurdle course (which is dotted with statues paying homage to traditional Japanese culture, like geisha kimonos, cherry blossoms, and taiko drums).

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For Dick Pound, the longest serving member of the International Olympic Committee, protesting at the Games is fine — as long as it doesn't "interfere" with the competition itself or awards ceremonies. The Olympics, in his view, are an oasis of calm in the middle of an increasingly tense world, and "we shouldn't be spoiling that by pointing out the obvious , which is that there are social and political problems." Watch his interview with Ian Bremmer on the latest episode of GZERO World on US public television.

India's rape problem: Hundreds of protesters have flocked to the streets of New Delhi for four days straight after a 9-year old girl was raped and murdered in a small village outside the capital while going to fetch water for her family. Some demonstrators burned effigies of India's PM Narendra Modi, saying that the government has not done enough — or anything, really — to address the country's abysmal rape problem: there were more than 32,000 rapes recorded in 2019, certainly a vast undercount given the stigma associated with reporting sexual assaults in India. The scourge of sexual violence against women and girls in India was brought to light in 2012 when a 23-year-old woman was gang raped and murdered while traveling on a bus in the nation's capital, prompting international outrage. Four men have been arrested in connection with this week's attack, though they have not been charged. The city of New Delhi, meanwhile, has ordered an inquiry to probe events surrounding the young girl's death, though Indians who have been sounding the alarm on violence against women for decades aren't expecting much to come of it.

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Subscribe to GZERO Media's newsletter, Signal

GZEROMEDIA

Subscribe to GZERO Media's newsletter: Signal

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GZEROMEDIA

Subscribe to GZERO Media's newsletter: Signal