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Hard Numbers: Russia wants a bigger piece of Africa

Hard Numbers: Russia wants a bigger piece of Africa

1: Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was formally indicted on corruption charges Tuesday, making him the first sitting prime minister to face trial in Israel's history. The charges came hours before Netanyahu was set to meet President Trump for the unveiling of the US' long-anticipated Mideast peace plan.


60,000: Clashes in Sudan's West Darfur between Arab and African ethnic groups have displaced some 60,000 Sudanese, with 4,000 people fleeing to neighboring Chad in the last week alone. An uptick in violence has undermined efforts by Sudan's transitional government to end Darfur's decades-long conflict.

200: Russia is raising its profile in Africa, recently sending 200 mercenaries to Mozambique to combat the surge of jihadist violence in the region. Moscow is already involved in Libya's civil war and is looking to build a port in the Horn of Africa, which would be Russia's first permanent military installation on the continent.

6: For the first time since being jailed for driving the failed Catalan independence bid in 2017, six Catalan politicians returned to Barcelona's regional parliament to attend a committee session addressing the consequences of that crisis. The former Cabinet members are serving prison sentences of between nine to 13 years for that independence bid.

Empathy and listening are key to establishing harmonious relationships, as demonstrated by Callista Azogu, GM of Human Resources & Organization for Nigerian Agip Oil Company (NAOC), an Eni subsidiary in Abuja. "To build trust is very difficult. To destroy it is very easy," says Callista, whose busy days involve everything from personnel issues to union relationships. She sees great potential for her native Nigeria not only because of the country's natural resources, but because of its vibrant and creative people.

Learn more about Callista in this episode of Faces of Eni.

For the world's wealthiest nations, including the United States, the rollout of COVID-19 vaccine has been rocky, to say the least. And as a result, much of the developing world will have to wait even longer for their turn. Part of the challenge, World Bank President David Malpass says, is that "advanced economies have reserved a lot of the vaccine doses." Malpass sat down with Ian Bremmer recently to talk about what his organization is doing to try to keep millions around the world from slipping deeper into poverty during the pandemic. Their conversation was part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Saturday will mark the beginning of an historic turning point for European politics as 1,001 voting members of Germany's Christian Democratic Union, the party of Chancellor Angela Merkel, hold an online conference to elect a new leader.

Here are the basic facts:

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For the first time in twenty years, extreme poverty around the world is growing. How does the developing world recover from a pandemic that has brought even the richest nations to their knees? David Malpass, the President of the World Bank, is tasked with answering that question. He joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to talk about how his organization is trying to keep the developing world from slipping further into poverty in the wake of a once-in-a-century pandemic.

Joe Biden wants to move into the White House, but the coast isn't clear. He may need some bleach.

Watch more PUPPET REGIME here.

The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

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