ATTITUDE ADJUSTMENT

The tireless researchers at Pew have just released their annual Global Attitudes Survey, which polls members of the public in 25 countries with questions about who runs the world, who should run the world, what they think of the US vs China, and so on. The full report is worth your time, but here is Alex Kliment (@SaoSasha) with a few highlights that stood out:


The world distrusts Trump, but still wants the US to lead

Most respondents outside the US have negative views of the US president – about 70 percent said they aren’t confident he’ll “do the right thing” in global affairs. But 63 percent of respondents said, often with large majorities, that they prefer a world led by the US to a world led by China. The only major outlier here was Russia.

From Russia with (a lot less) Love

Most foreigners’ views of Trump have improved slightly from the terrible lows set last year. And he remains very popular in the Philippines, Israel, Nigeria and Kenya. But one staggering change was the collapse in support among Russians, where confidence in the US president soared to 53 percent after he was elected, but fell to 19 percent this year. This reflects the fact that despite the apparent affection between Trump and Putin, the US president hasn’t delivered much for Moscow.

They’re with Her

The world leader who rated highest among those surveyed is (shocker) not Trump. Nor is it Putin. Even Xi Jinping, for all he has done to expand Chinese power, has yet to convince the rest of the globe that he should lead it. It was German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Embattled at home, trusted abroad.

China is popular with the kids 

Favorable views of China in the US have fallen from 44 to 38 percent as Washington and Beijing have locked horns over trade. But among younger people, positive views outnumber negative ones by a sizeable 15-point margin.

Most countries still see the US as the leading economic power, but…

There are a few notable exceptions: China is seen as the leader in Australia – and has been for a decade. Meanwhile, 59 percent of Germans polled rate China ahead of the US. Two years ago it was about 30 percent.

 

Kevin Sneader, global managing partner of McKinsey & Company, answers the question: Are CEOs getting real about climate change?

The answer, yes. Why? One, it's personal. Many have watched with horror the wildfires that took place recently. Others have even been evacuated. And for some, the snow set in Davos, they experienced incredibly mild temperatures that laid all to quip that climate change really has arrived. But the other reasons are a growing understanding of the nature of climate change.

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Welcome to the eleventh parliamentary elections in Iran's 40-year history.

Want to run for a seat? You can…if you're an Iranian citizen between the ages of 30 and 75, hold a master's degree or its equivalent, have finished your military service (if you're a man), and have demonstrated a commitment to Islam. Check all these boxes, and you can ask permission to run for office.

Permission comes from the 12-member Guardian Council, a body composed of six clerics appointed by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and six jurists that Khamenei appoints indirectly. If the Council says yes, you can win a seat in parliament. If they say no, you can't.

This parliament, also called the Majlis, does have real power. It approves the national budget, drafts legislation and sends it to the Guardian Council for approval, ratifies treaties, approves ministers and can question the president. The current Majlis represents a wide range of values and opinions.

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As the head of a leading management consulting firm, global managing partner of McKinsey & Company Kevin Sneader has an inside view into the challenges facing the world's top executives. Every Thursday, Sneader will address questions about key issues like attracting and retaining talent, growing revenue, navigating change, staying ahead of the competition, and corporate responsibility – all in 60 seconds.

GZERO's Alex Kliment interviews New Yorker correspondent and author Joshua Yaffa. The two discuss Yaffa's new book, Between Two Fires, about what life is like for Russians today. They also sample some vodka at a famous Russian restaurant in NYC, of course!