Hard Numbers

315 million: Profits at a Chinese utility company have increased by $315 million since it began monitoring its employees’ brainwaves with special hats in 2014. The technology allows managers to use AI programs to detect emotional spikes and stress and to change staffing appropriately.


65: Oil prices have risen 65% since last June, touching a four year high of $75 a barrel last week. Three things are driving up prices: ongoing production restraint from Russia and Saudi Arabia, dwindling production in Venezuela and Libya, and the prospect that US withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal will mean fresh sanctions on Iranian oil exports.

50: South Koreans’ trust in North Korean leader Kim Jong-un surged by 50 percentage points as a result of the historic Koreas summit last Friday. On the day of the summit, 64.7 percent of those surveyed said they thought the enigmatic North Korean dictator would denuclearize and lay the groundwork for peace on the peninsula, up from 14.7 percent before it, according to the research agency Realmeter.

31: Washington’s Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley says that UN member states voted against the United States 31 percent of the time last year, even though Uncle Sam accounts for 22 percent of the international organization’s budget. “This is not an acceptable return on our investment,” she said, detailing a list of countries that vote against Washington most often.

6: The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees is currently running an appeal for $46 million to assist Venezuelan refugees who have fled to neighboring countries. But a spokesperson said just 6 percent of the appeal has so far been raised, and many observers believe the target figure is far too low to begin with.

Ferrera Erbognone, a small town in the northern Italian province of Pavia, is home to one of the most cutting-edge computing centers in the world: Eni's Green Data Center. All of the geophysical and seismic prospecting data Eni produces from all over the world ends up here. Now, the Green Data Center is welcoming a new supercomputing system: HPC5, an advanced version of the already powerful HPC4. Due to be completed by early 2020, HPC5 will triple the Green Data Center's computing power, from 18.6 to 52 petaflops, equivalent to 52 million billion mathematical operations per second.

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

Why is Instagram going to hide likes?

Well, one explanation is that they want to encourage healthy behavior and a like can make us addicted. Second explanation is that they get rid of the likes, they can get more of the cut in the market for influencers, who get money from advertisers, sometimes based on likes.

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This week, the process of impeaching President Trump entered the critical phase as the House of Representatives held its first public hearings. The battle lines are now drawn.

The Democrats say that there is compelling evidence that Trump withheld badly needed military to aid to an ally at war to pressure that country's government to provide him with personal political benefit by helping him discredit a political rival.

The Republicans say that the evidence comes mainly from witnesses with little or no direct contact with the president, and that the military aid was delivered to Ukraine without the Ukrainian president taking the actions Trump is alleged to have demanded.

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The fight for the Nile: In recent days, the Trump administration has tried to mediate three-way talks between Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia on their long-running dispute to access the waters of the Nile. In short, a 1929 treaty gave Egypt and Sudan rights to nearly all Nile waters and the right to veto any attempt by upstream countries to claim a greater share. But in 2011, Ethiopia began work on the so-called Grand Renaissance Dam on the Blue Nile tributary from where 85 percent of the Nile's waters flow. The project, due for completion next year, will be Africa's largest hydroelectric power plant. Egypt, which draws 85 percent of its water from the Nile, has made threats that raised fears of military action. We're watching as this conflict finally comes to a head early next year.

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