GZERO Media logo

What We're Watching & What We're Ignoring

WHAT WE'RE WATCHING

Billionaire kingmakers in US politics – The man who brought the world the venti caramel Frappuccino shook up US politics over the weekend, telling 60 Minutes that he's "seriously considering" running for president as a "centrist independent." Former Starbucks boss Howard Schultz, estimated to be worth $3 billion, certainly has the cash to mount a credible outsider challenge. But Democrats and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, another independent-minded billionaire who has toyed with a presidential bid, warned the move could split opposition to Donald Trump, helping the incumbent president win another term. Trump himself questioned whether Schultz had "the guts" to enter the race. We're watching this closely, because a well-funded independent run would add an extra shot of crazy to the 2020 contest.

The concerns of America's intelligence chiefs – The leaders of America's major intelligence agencies presented their annual threat assessment to the Senate yesterday. The report highlighted the fracturing of America's global alliances and growing strategic alignment between China and Russia as two major threats. On other issues, like North Korea and Iran, the intelligence community and Trump administration are decidedly out of step. Trump has been at odds with the experts before, but this year he'll also be facing an emboldened Democratic majority in the House, making it harder to downplay the disconnect.

WHAT WE'RE IGNORING

Theresa May's latest Brexit "victory" – Yesterday, the UK's embattled prime minister scored a pyrrhic victory with the defeat of a bill that would have forced her to delay Brexit unless a "no deal" scenario, in which ties with the EU are abruptly severed, is categorically ruled out. Parliament also passed an amendment calling on May to modify a section of the current deal that temporarily maintains the free flow of goods and people along the North Irish border, spurring hopes that there might actually be a Brexit agreement that can gain the support of Parliament. But here's the problem: the EU has made clear for months it isn't willing to budge on the issue. This "victory" smells more like a prelude to defeat.

Cambodia's record-breaking propaganda – Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen is taking a novel approach to exciting the country's youthful population about his aged, authoritarian government: calling in the Guinness Book of World Records. Since 2015, the strongman ruler and his 36-year-old son, Hun Many, have engineered a string of record-breaking stunts, including the world's biggest sticky rice cake (8,900 pounds), longest scarf (3,772 feet), our personal favorite, a 2,015 person Madison line dance, and most recently, in November, the world's longest dragon boat (286 feet). We're ignoring these obvious marketing ploys, and watching this video about a record-breaking cat that's longer than a baseball bat instead.

Carbon has a bad rep, but did you know it's a building block of life? As atoms evolved, carbon trapped in CO2 was freed, giving way to the creation of complex molecules that use photosynthesis to convert carbon to food. Soon after, plants, herbivores, and carnivores began populating the earth and the cycle of life began.

Learn more about how carbon created life on Earth in the second episode of Eni's Story of CO2 series.

As we enter the homestretch of the US presidential election — which is set to be the most contentious, and possibly contested, in generations — Americans are also voting on 35 seats up for grabs in a battle for the control of the Senate. The 100-member body is currently held 53-47 by the Republican Party, but many individual races are wide open, and the Democrats are confident they can flip the upper chamber of Congress.

Either way, the result will have a profound impact not only on domestic policy, but also on US foreign relations and other issues with global reach. Here are a few areas where what US senators decide reverberates well beyond American shores.

More Show less

On September 23, GZERO Media — in partnership with Microsoft and Eurasia Group — gathered global experts to discuss global recovery from the coronavirus pandemic in a livestream panel. Our panel for the discussion Crisis Response & Recovery: Reimagining while Rebuilding, included:

  • Brad Smith, President, Microsoft
  • Ian Bremmer, President and Founder, Eurasia Group & GZERO Media
  • Jeh Johnson, Partner, Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, LLP and former Secretary of Homeland Security.
  • John Frank, Vice President, UN Affairs at Microsoft
  • Susan Glasser, staff writer and Washington columnist, The New Yorker (moderator)

Special appearances by UN Secretary-General António Guterres, European Central Bank chief Christine Lagarde, and comedian/host Trevor Noah.

More Show less

Jon Lieber, who leads Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, offers insights on the Supreme Court vacancy:

Will Senate Republicans, who stopped a Supreme Court nomination in 2016, because it was too close to an election, pay a political price for the change in tactics this time around?

Not only do I think they won't pay a political price, I think in many cases, they're going to benefit. Changing the balance of power on the Supreme Court has been a career-long quest for many conservatives and many Republicans. And that's why you've seen so many of them fall in line behind the President's nomination before we even know who it is.

At this point, do Senate Democrats have any hope of stopping President Trump from filling the ninth seat on the Supreme Court?

More Show less

In a special GZERO Media livestream on global response and recovery amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Eurasia Group & GZERO Media president Ian Bremmer discussed the difference between Europe's unified approach to economic stimulus and the deeply divided and political nature of the current conversation in the US. While initial stimulus support was bipartisan, there is little chance of Democrats and Republicans coming together again ahead of the November 3 presidential election. "It's red state versus blue state. President Trump's saying that coronavirus isn't so bad if you take the blue states out. He's president of the blue states, you can't take the blue states out," Bremmer told moderator Susan Glasser of The New Yorker.

UNGA banner

GZEROMEDIA

Subscribe to GZERO Media's Newsletter: Signal

Panel: How will the world recover from COVID-19?

UNGA Livestream