GZERO Media logo

WRESTLING WITH FOREIGN POLICY

WRESTLING WITH FOREIGN POLICY

Last month, your Friday author heard an excellent speech from Gillian Tett of the Financial Times in which she recounted, among other things, observations from Naomi Klein's book No is Not Enough on President Trump's personal history with American professional wrestling and its impact on his political style. Tett wrote on the subject here.


If you've seen an American wrestling match, you'll recognize the atmosphere at many Trump rallies: the pumped-up, angry crowds, the chanting, and the emasculating nicknames wrestlers use to belittle one another. It's a chaotic (carefully choreographed) spectacle.

As Klein points out, it's also an audience and a ritual that liberals and the wealthy in the US tend to ignore. That makes it harder for them to recognize the fears and needs of many people who feel completely overlooked in American society. President Trump understands this.

But professional wrestling also presents a "morality play." When warriors enter the ring, every spectator knows which one is the hero and which is the villain. There can be no heroes without villains. It's the villain that defines the hero.

Trump is hardly unique in his search for useful foils. This is an element not only of the political arena but of human nature. But given his business and personal ties with professional wrestling and its most successful promoters, its influence is revealing for understanding his foreign policy—and the adversaries he's most likely to cast as villains over the coming (very challenging) two years.

Which baddies does the Trump crowd boo with greatest gusto?

China: There are good reasons why the US—and other governments—demand changes to Beijing's economic, trade, and investment policies. But China is especially well cast as a bad guy for Trump's audience because many of his most loyal supporters see that country as the threatening power on the rise, one that has "stolen" large numbers of US manufacturing jobs.

Mexico: Last month, Trump told Plitico: "I will tell you, politically speaking, that issue [of halting immigration across the US-Mexican border] is a total winner." The president's midterm election strategy made clear that, whether Trump's supporters see would-be border-crossers as jobseekers or gang-bangers, they want to keep them out of the US. Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, Mexico's leftist new president, has promised to help Central Americans escape hardship. For now, Trump and Lopez Obrador have a few things in common, but that relationship looks likely to head south.

Iran: Many of Trump's voters are older—in fact, old enough to remember the national humiliation many felt when Iranian revolutionaries held 52 Americans hostage inside the US embassy in Tehran for 444 days from November 1979 to January 1981. But Trump supporters also tend to prioritize support for Israel's security. Iranians, more than their Arab neighbors, are apt to publicly threaten Israel.

These aren't the only villains Trump supporters want to see him throw from the ring, but they're the most reliable of his political bad guys—and there are more than enough areas of real disagreement with these governments to fuel many a fight in months to come.

Empathy and listening are key to establishing harmonious relationships, as demonstrated by Callista Azogu, GM of Human Resources & Organization for Nigerian Agip Oil Company (NAOC), an Eni subsidiary in Abuja. "To build trust is very difficult. To destroy it is very easy," says Callista, whose busy days involve everything from personnel issues to union relationships. She sees great potential for her native Nigeria not only because of the country's natural resources, but because of its vibrant and creative people.

Learn more about Callista in this episode of Faces of Eni.

Saturday will mark the beginning of an historic turning point for European politics as 1,001 voting members of Germany's Christian Democratic Union, the party of Chancellor Angela Merkel, hold an online conference to elect a new leader.

Here are the basic facts:

More Show less

If former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson could give incoming Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas advice, what would it be? "Well, first I would say, 'Ali, I'm glad it's you, not me.'" His conversation with Ian Bremmer was part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Listen: For the first time in twenty years extreme poverty around the world is growing. How does the developing world recover from a pandemic that has brought even the richest nations to their knees? David Malpass, the President of the World Bank, is tasked with answering that question. He joins Ian Bremmer on the podcast to talk about how his organization is trying to keep the developing world from slipping further into poverty in the wake of a once-in-a-century pandemic.

Does Cuba belong back on the US's State Sponsors of Terrorism list? The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board showed their support for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's decision on this issue in a recent opinion piece, "Cuba's Support for Terror." But in this edition of The Red Pen, Ian Bremmer and Eurasia Group analysts Risa Grais-Targow, Jeffrey Wright and Regina Argenzio argue that the WSJ's op-ed goes too far.

We are now just a few days away from the official end of Donald Trump's presidency, but the impacts of his latest moves in office will obviously last far beyond Joe Biden's inauguration. There's the deep structural political polarization, the ongoing investigations into the violence we saw at the Capitol, lord knows what happens over the next few days, there's also last-minute policy decisions here and abroad. And that's where we're taking our Red Pen this week, specifically US relations with Cuba.

More Show less
The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

GZEROMEDIA

Subscribe to GZERO Media's Newsletter: Signal